Nunavut Legal Services Study

Figure 2.3: Family Structure by Province or Territory (1996)

This is a stacked vertical bar chart that illustrates the family structure by Province or Territory for the year 1996.

The Y axis represents the family structure and is measured in percentages, in increments of twenty starting from 0 to 120.

The X axis represents the Provinces and Territory and the type of family structure.

The following Provinces and Territory are listed from left to right:

  • Newfoundland and Labrador,
  • Prince Edward Island,
  • Nova Scotia,
  • New Brunswick,
  • Quebec,
  • Ontario,
  • Manitoba,
  • Saskatchewan,
  • Alberta,
  • British Columbia,
  • Yukon,
  • Northwest Territories and
  • Nunavut. 

Family structures are classified as follows: Married, Common-Law and Lone Parent.

  • In the province of Newfoundland and Labrador almost 80% of the families belong to the married category, less than 10% are classified as common-law and less than 20% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Prince Edward Island, almost 80% of the families belong to the married category, less than 10% are classified as common-law and less than 20% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Nova Scotia, almost 80% of the families belong to the married category, less than 10% are classified as common-law and less than 20% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of New Brunswick, almost 80% of the families belong to the married category, less than 10% are classified as common-law and less than 20% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Quebec, slightly over 60% of the families belong to the married category, about 20% are classified as common-law and less than 20% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Ontario, about 80% of the families belong to the married category, about 5% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Manitoba, about 80% of the families belong to the married category, about 5% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Saskatchewan, about 80% of the families belong to the married category, about 5% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of Alberta, about 80% of the families belong to the married category, about 5% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the province of British Columbia, about 80% of the families belong to the married category, about 5% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In Yukon, about 60% of the families belong to the married category, about 25% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In the Northwest Territories, about 60% of the families belong to the married category, about 25% are classified as common-law and about 15% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
  • In Nunavut, about 50% of the families belong to the married category, about 30% are classified as common-law and about 20% are classified as belonging to the lone parent group.
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