Family Violence Initiative

COMPENDIUM OF PROMISING PRACTICES TO REDUCE VIOLENCE AND INCREASE SAFETY OF ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN CANADA – COMPENDIUM ANNEX: DETAILED PRACTICE DESCRIPTIONS

ECONOMIC CIRCUMSTANCES

Access to Justice Services

Program name:

Aboriginal Restorative Justice Program

Organization:

Onashowewin Inc.

Location:

Winnipeg, Manitoba

Target Group:

Everyone.

Contact Name:

Cora Morgan, Executive Director

Phone:

204-336-3600

Email:

cmorgan@onashowewin.com

Website:

www.onashowewin.com

Program Overview
History:

The program was started in 2002. The program provides Aboriginal Restorative Justice Services for urban Aboriginal people in Winnipeg. Clients are predominantly referred by the Manitoba Crown Attorney's Office, but the program is currently working on strategies to expand the client base. Since that time the organization has grown and now offers 10 workshops to clients.

Program Description
Goals & Objectives:

To establish restorative and holistic approaches for achieving justice that take into account the needs and strengths of the community. Restoring, healing and transforming relationships and the community.

Traditional/Indigenous ways:

Different cultural teachings and ways are offered, depending on the individual. This approach is a fundamental component of the organization, services and workshops. Traditionally-focused workshops include: Ways of Being: a full-day workshop where participants learn how to build a sweat lodge and then participate in the sweat lodge ceremony and sharing circle; Ikwe: (youth and adult) a program that teaches the traditional role of women (Ikwe) and explores special gifts that only women have; Ininni: a program that teaches the traditional role of men (Ininni) and their associated responsibilities and codes of conduct within society.

Components of program:

In addition to a case development model, a number of processes to resolve conflict where charges have been laid are utilized. If necessary, clients are referred to other community programs, services and assessments. The Brave Path is the first step in the program. The Brave Path is a customized case plan that is designed to meet the needs of each client. The Community Justice Worker (CJW) will determine the workshops and services in which the client will take part. The CJW will contact the victim of each offender and offer them an opportunity to influence the offender's Brave Path. The Brave Path is determined by the type of charge and willingness of the offender to take responsibility for the damage caused. Once the client has completed the case plan, the file is successfully closed. The client may also be referred to additional agencies for treatment, shelters, housing, training, employment and education opportunities. Workshops include: a parenting program: resumé writing program; Sense of Belonging: a two hour workshop that looks at the appeal of gang life and the downfalls membership brings. The workshop offers substitutes and resources that could help with avoiding or leaving the gang life; One Life: a two hour workshop that addresses addiction issues, explains indicators of addictions, impacts on life, friends, family plus what resources are available for help; Negative Energy: two two-hour sessions that focus on anger and negative reactions to anger. Participants learn to identify triggers and how to keep their anger in check.

Services/How they work:

Services are provided on site at the facility.

Funding:

Funding is provided by Manitoba Justice; and the Department of Justice Canada.

Relationships and Stakeholders
Involvement of Target Groups:

Workshops are designed around community feedback.

Partners:

Centre for Aboriginal Human Resource Development, Employment and Training; Broadway Neighbour Centre; Eagle Urban Transition Centre; Kanikanichick

Other relationships:

N/A

Details of Program Evaluation
Evaluation:

An evaluation has been completed.

Highlights of Evaluation Findings:

The report was not made available publicly, and no specific results can be provided.

Program Outcomes
Measures of Success:

Success is measured against program participants' successes in making better life choices.

Achievements:

Gaining respect in the community for the programming provided. Successfully helping people live a better life.

Challenges:

Obtaining funding.

Things to Know to Replicate
Replication Advice:

The program is considered replicable. What makes this organization successful is the staff. The programs being culturally and traditionally based forms the foundation of the program model.

Resources:

Adequate funding and appropriately trained and motivated staff are essential to program success.

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