Family Violence Initiative

COMPENDIUM OF PROMISING PRACTICES TO REDUCE VIOLENCE AND INCREASE SAFETY OF ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN CANADA – COMPENDIUM ANNEX: DETAILED PRACTICE DESCRIPTIONS

INTERACTIONS WITHIN COMMUNITIES

Healthy Relationships: Children and Youth

Program name:

The Fourth R: Uniting Our Nations – Relationship-based Programming for Aboriginal Youth

Organization:

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Centre for Prevention Science

Location:

London, Ontario and surrounding area

Target Group:

Aboriginal teenagers (ages 13-17)

Contact Name:

Dr. Claire Crooks

Phone:

519-858-5130

Email:

sburns@uwo.ca

Website:

http://youthrelationships.org/schoolbasedprojects.html

Program Overview
History:

The program was piloted in 2005. Feedback is continuously collected and the program is adapted based on feedback or requirements of the target audiences. Most changes to date have been changes to the cultural aspects of the program to ensure they reflect the target audience. The core lessons have remained fairly constant.

Program Description
Goals & Objectives:

To promote healthier relationships and scholastic success and decreasing violence and related risk behaviours.

Traditional/Indigenous ways:

There are traditional Medicine Wheel teachings that are used to bring a culturally relevant content to the program.

Components of program:

The program provides social environmental support to client through the use of workshops designed to develop: individual, educational and skills development, individual behaviour change, and individual asset development.

Services/How they work:

Services are provided on site at the facility.

Funding:

Funding is provided by the Ontario Ministry of Education; the Public Health Agency of Canada; Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General; Royal LePage Shelter Foundation; Canadian Institute of Health Research; Canadian Women's Foundation; and private sector contributions.

Relationships and Stakeholders
Involvement of Target Groups:

Communities provide input that allows program to adapt to cultures. Community members, including Elders and representatives of Friendship Centres, also participate as guest speakers. Newsletters go out to parents and students are given assignments to do at home with their parents.

Partners:

Thames Valley District School Board; The Centre for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children.

Other relationships:

Friendship Centres, communities, and band councils.

Details of Program Evaluation
Evaluation:

An evaluation has been completed.

Highlights of Evaluation Findings:

Initial findings indicate that 78-100% of the interventions' process implementation objectives were achieved.

Program Outcomes
Measures of Success:

Success is measured against the clients' ability to successfully implement the skills developed during the program sessions into their lives.

Achievements:

Increasing students' self-reliance and their independence from peer pressure.

Challenges:

Obtaining funding. Lack of resources (funding, equipment, time). It has been a challenge competing with other community issues and priorities for support.

Things to Know to Replicate
Replication Advice:

The program is considered replicable. In order for youth to benefit from these strengths-enhancing opportunities, they need to be engaged by them. Also teacher buy-in is a critical factor in ensuring the course is delivered to the students in the manner it was developed. Fidelity to the program curriculum and/or manuals is important.

Resources:

Adequate funding, properly trained staff and facility space for the programming would be necessary to ensure the program's success.

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