Family Violence Initiative

COMPENDIUM OF PROMISING PRACTICES TO REDUCE VIOLENCE AND INCREASE SAFETY OF ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN CANADA – COMPENDIUM ANNEX: DETAILED PRACTICE DESCRIPTIONS

INTERACTIONS WITHIN COMMUNITIES

Changing Community Attitudes toward Violence

Program name:

Oskayikisitothn – Aboriginal Women's and Children's Program

Organization:

Strengthening the Spirit Committee

Location:

Calgary, Alberta /Siksika First Nation, Alberta

Target Group:

Women and Men (18-68) and Children (6-12)

Contact Name:

Laura Ducharme, Coordinator

Phone:

403-206-2100

Email:

laurad@homefrontcalgary.com

Website:

N/A

Program Overview
History:

This is a three year pilot project that began in March 2009 and will end in March of 2012.

Program Description
Goals & Objectives:

To increase safety and knowledge of historical trauma, cultural and intergenerational trauma, and intimate violence through a psycho-educational program.

Traditional/Indigenous ways:

Local Elders are sought to be a part of the committee in order to provide a strong cultural component to the program.

Components of program:

The program seeks to empower communities through the creation of a cultural domestic violence treatment program. The facilitators go to the community and build a committee made up of community members. Through a train the trainer program the community becomes able to facilitate, manage and find sustainable funding to keep their own uniquely designed program in operation.

Services/How they work:

Services are rendered in the participating communities

Funding:

Funding is provided from NTC Crime Prevention; and in kind donations from Homefront.

Relationships and Stakeholders
Involvement of Target Groups:

Community committees collaborate with service agencies.

Partners:

Partnerships vary from community to community. Each development is community specific.

Other relationships:

N/A

Details of Program Evaluation
Evaluation:

An evaluation has been completed.

Highlights of Evaluation Findings:

The program was found to be one of the most comprehensive of its kind and follows the best practices in Alberta with regard to violence treatment committees and creating a standard of treatment in Alberta. The evaluation report is available at
http://www.homefrontcalgary.com/assets/files/HomeFront%20Evaluation%20Final%20Report.pdf

Program Outcomes
Measures of Success:

Through the numbers of facilitators trained and how many people have completed the program.

Achievements:

Some of the main accomplishments include the capacity that has been built, and that the facility has sustainable, comprehensive response teams. Successes include Siksika Nation received funding for a family violence response team, First Responding, because of collaborative work.

Challenges:

Obtaining funding. Women's programs have a high dropout rate. There is a challenge of clients having transportation to attend programs.

Things to Know to Replicate
Replication Advice:

The program is considered replicable. Someone needs to do the coordination and smaller communities need training.

Resources:

Adequate funding and staff to train community members are needed in order for the program to succeed.

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