2013–14 Departmental Performance Report
Supplementary Information Tables

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund

Name of transfer payment program:

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2003

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Support Fund is designed to facilitate access to justice in both official languages through various means, including the creation of legal and linguistic tools, workshops and training to bilingual lawyers and stakeholders of the justice system, the development of related training material and provision of public legal education and information. Its objectives are to increase the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer justice services in both official languages and to increase awareness in the legal community and official language minority and majority communities concerning their rights and issues related to access to justice in both official languages.

Recipients:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations;
  • Provincial and territorial governments, regional and municipal governments, provincial and territorial Crown corporations;
  • Canadian institutions/boards of education, including Centres for jurilinguistics.
Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

The Department reviewed over 43 applications for funding in 2013–2014. Of these the following were approved:

  • 11 pertained to the justice training in both official languages component (six of which were specifically related to provincial court judges);
  • 8 supported the activities of French-speaking jurists Associations and their Federation, including activities related to providing information directly to the public;
  • 9 pertained to awareness and public legal information activities in order to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages ‐ a project by Éducaloi was related to providing information to the Anglophone community on language rights and legal topics;
  • 1 contributed to the development of a curriculum for bilingual students interested in pursuing a career in the field of justice;
  • 1 aimed to increase recruitment and promotion of justice-related careers;
  • 5 focused on developing linguistic training tools, including the Jurisource.ca portal that provides justice professionals working with official language minority communities with legal and jurilinguistic resources.

The Department continued to work with its partners to increase awareness among Canadians and the legal profession about issues related to official languages in official language minority communities and to improve the capacity of stakeholders to offer services in both official languages and ultimately to improve access to justice in both official languages. To achieve this, the Department financed projects aiming to better equip justice stakeholders, including judges of provincial criminal courts, to offer services in both official languages. Stakeholders were able to benefit from training in legal terminology adapted to their needs and which allow them to increase and improve their service delivery in both official languages. In support of training, projects dealing with the design and distribution of judicial language tools were developed. Stakeholders have access to a multitude of tools that help them in delivering justice services. In 2013-201, more than 390 justice professionals have taken training and stakeholders reported that 95% of professionals who underwent training use tools. Efforts aimed at the recruitment strategy and at promoting careers in justice resulted in the support of projects that also reached francophone minority cultural communities, who benefitted from receiving information on the Canadian justice system and support to pursue studies related to careers in justice. Lastly, as the Department will promote the provision of legal information and justice services directly to the public, it supported organizations to undertaken feasibility studies to establish justice information hubs.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total grants $28,226 $42,880 $50,000 $600,000 $49,466 $534
Total contributions $6,110,114 $6,743,233 $2,842,845 $5,892,845 $4,231,006 $(1,388,161)
Total program $6,138,340 $6,786,113 $2,892,845 $6,492,845 $4,280,472 $(1,387,627)
Comments on variances:

Additional resources allocated to the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund were received ($3.6M in Grants and Contributions) through the Supplementary Estimates (C) in 2013–2014. As these funds were received late in the fiscal year, the Department was unable to consider and fund the projects it had received. These projects will now be considered in fiscal year 2014–2015.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The Evaluation of the Initiatives in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages was completed in fiscal year 2012–2013 and is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/12/bole-edlo/index.html and http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/12/edlo-bole/index.html. The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 2017-2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Throughout the year, Justice Canada actively engaged its network of stakeholders from official language minority communities by way of conference calls, written correspondence, in person meetings, and via its online newsletter. Justice Canada used information and knowledge gained from its engagement with stakeholders to implement its access to justice in both official language strategy, which is based on two pillars: information and training. Particularly, in 2013–2014, Justice Canada assisted its stakeholders in the set up of local justice information hubs.

Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund

Name of transfer payment program:

Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 1991 as Aboriginal Justice Initiative, renewed as Aboriginal Justice Strategy in 1996, 2002, 2007, 2012, 2013, 2014.

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) enables Aboriginal communities to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice and provides timely and effective alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. AJS programs are also aimed at reducing the rates of victimization; crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs; and, helping the mainstream justice system become more responsive and sensitive to the needs and culture of Aboriginal communities.

Recipients: (a) First Nations, Bands, Tribal Councils, local, regional and national Aboriginal organizations; (b) regional/municipal governments including their agencies and institutions; (c) non-profit community organizations, societies, and associations which have voluntarily associated themselves for a non-profit purpose; (d) provincial and territorial governments; (e) individuals; and (f) for-profit corporations, so long as these corporations will not make a profit on the work performed.

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

The Department worked successfully with provincial and territorial partners and Aboriginal communities to implement and advance the AJS. Economic Action Plan 2014 proposed renewed funding of $22.2 million over two years for the AJS. The AJS has revised data collection procedures, in collaboration with provincial and territorial partners, to ensure that consistent national data is available. The AJS supports approximately 275 community-led programs that serve over 800 urban, rural, and Northern communities, both on- and off-reserve. Approximately 10,000 Aboriginal people were referred to AJS community-based justice programs each year.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total grants $21,573 $50,000 $0 $50,000 $50,000 $(50,000)
Total contributions $11,942,714 $12,430,517 $2,900,000 $12,450,000 $12,443,549 $(9,543,549)
Total program $11,964,287 $12,480,517 $2,900,000 $12,500,000 $12,493,549 $(9,593,549)
Comments on variances:

The AJS includes ongoing and sunsetting grants and contributions funding. The sunsetting AJS funding was renewed for 2013–2014 and received through Supplementary Estimates B ($9.8M). An earlier launch of the Capacity-Building Fund call for proposal also allowed the AJS to expend the majority of its allocated grant funding in 2013- 2014.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The AJS evaluation final report was completed in November 2011. It is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/11/ajs-sja/index.html and http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/11/sja-ajs/index.html. The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Applicants and recipients were engaged through ongoing interactions with Justice Canada officials relating to funding, reporting and sharing of information on Aboriginal justice-related issues. The AJS Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group held regular teleconferences to engage provincial and territorial partners. The Working Group serves as a forum for discussing the AJS as well as any cross-jurisdictional issues that arise. During 2013–2014, discussions were focussed on the renewal of the program.

Aboriginal Courtwork Program

Name of transfer payment program:

Aboriginal Courtwork Program (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 1978

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The objective of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program (ACW) is to improve access to justice by helping Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. It is the only ongoing justice related program available to all Aboriginal people (adult and youth), regardless of status and residency. The Program provides Aboriginal persons in contact with the criminal justice system (whether as accused, victims, witnesses or family members) with timely and accurate information on their rights, obligations, roles and responsibilities at the earliest possible stage of the criminal justice process. Services also include referring clients to appropriate legal and social resources in their community to help them address underlying issues that may contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. Aboriginal Courtworkers serve as a "bridge" between criminal justice officials and Aboriginal people and communities by providing information, cultural context, liaison, and promoting communications and understanding.

Recipients: Federal contributions will be made to provincial governments to provide Aboriginal Courtwork services to Aboriginal persons (adults and youths) charged with an offence under any federal or provincial statute or municipal by-law. A province may authorize one or more agencies to deliver Aboriginal Courtwork services on its behalf. All designated delivery agencies will be accountable to the funders. In addition, the Projects in Support of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program component provide modest support for projects that further the mandate of the Program.

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

This year marked the 35th Anniversary of the Government of Canada's ongoing commitment to support Aboriginal Courtwork Program services nationally. The Aboriginal Courtwork Program ensures that Aboriginal people in contact with the justice system (whether as accused persons, victims, witnesses or family members) have access to fair, equitable and culturally-sensitive treatment and services throughout court processes.

Over 170 Courtworkers across Canada provide services to almost 440 communities and over 50,000 clients each year.

In 2013–2014 the Aboriginal Courtwork Program Renewal Strategy was implemented and new five-year Aboriginal Courtwork Program Agreements (2013-2018) were concluded with participating provinces (currently Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island do not have ACW Programs). The number of provincial communities with resident Courtworkers decreased in 2013–2014 from 138 to 135 due in part to the cessation of the Newfoundland and Labrador Aboriginal Courtwork Program.

As part of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program Renewal Strategy, in 2013 a National Evaluation (which included a client survey undertaken in 2011) was finalized. The National Evaluation indicated that Aboriginal Courtworkers have positively impacted the way Aboriginal people in contact with the criminal justice system are treated. Courtworkers have increased the efficiency of courts (especially in remote communities) and increased client confidence in the justice system. The value of the program and services was demonstrated through a 92% national satisfaction rating from clients who had received services and by 96% of Court officials who stated a continued need for Aboriginal Courtwork Program services.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total contributions $5,411,363 $4,896,898 $4,911,363 $5,155,580 $5,155,570 $(244,207)
Total program $5,411,363 $4,896,898 $4,911,363 $5,155,580 $5,155,570 $(244,207)
Comments on variances:

The $244K variance was transferred to the ACW Program in 2013–14 for a national training event recognizing the 35th anniversary of the program. This amount was in addition to the planned spending and not part of the ongoing ACW program budget.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

A national evaluation of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program was completed in 2012–2013 and confirmed the continued relevance and effectiveness of the federal contribution in helping to ensure that the justice system remains fair, relevant and accessible to all Canadians. The evaluation also confirmed strong support and demand for Aboriginal Courtwork services from court officials, Aboriginal community stakeholders and clients. It is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/13/acp-paa/ and http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/13/paa-acp/. The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 2017-2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Justice Canada engaged applicants and recipients through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Working Group on the Aboriginal Courtwork Program, which serves as a resource on issues related to the Program and on issues related to Aboriginal people in the justice system, and through the Tripartite Working Group on the Aboriginal Courtwork Program, which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussion of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning the Program. In 2013–2014, recipient engagement focused primarily on implementing the Aboriginal Courtwork Program Renewal Strategy (for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018) and activities recognizing the 35th Anniversary of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program.

Legal Aid Systems

Name of transfer payment program:

Legal Aid Systems (Voted)

Start date:

August 17, 1971

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The objective of the federal Legal Aid Program is to contribute to sustaining a national system of justice that helps to ensure that economically disadvantaged persons have access to the justice system, through contribution funding in support of criminal, youth criminal justice and immigration and refugee legal aid services provided by the provinces (funding for criminal and civil legal aid in the territories is provided through the Access to Justice Services Agreements).

Recipients: Provinces

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

Provinces were enabled to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total contributions $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $120,327,507 $120,327,507 $120,327,507 $0
Total program $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $120,327,507 $120,327,507 $120,327,507 $0
Comments on variances:

N/A

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The most recent evaluation final report was completed in January 2012. It is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/12/lap-paj/index.html and http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/12/paj-lap/index.html. The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 2016-2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Permanent Working Group on Legal Aid (PWG). The PWG was created as a forum for discussion and joint policy development in legal aid matters. The resultant collaboration promotes the development and implementation of legal aid policy in Canada.

Youth Justice Services

Name of transfer payment program:

Youth Justice Services Funding Program (Voted)

Start date:

April 2, 1984

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The overall objective of this Program is to support the policy directions of the Youth Justice Initiative. The specific objectives of the individual agreements are to support and promote an appropriate range of programs and services that encourage accountability measures for unlawful behaviour that are proportionate and timely; encourage the effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into their communities; target the formal court process to the most serious offences; and target detention and custody to the most serious offences.

Recipients: Provinces and territories

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

Through the Youth Justice Services Funding Program (YJSFP), provinces and territories were supported in providing a range of youth justice programs and services that target young persons in conflict with the law. Specifically, the YJSFP targeted federal funding towards programs and services that encourage timely and proportionate accountability measures for unlawful behaviour; effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons; and, targeted the formal court process, detention and custody to the most serious offenders. In 2013–14, the YJSFP funding agreements were implemented with all provinces and territories (except Québec where negotiations were finalized in 2014-15) for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total contributions $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $0
Total program $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $0
Comments on variances:

N/A

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Following a renewal in 2012–2013, YJSFP funding agreements were implemented with all provinces and territories for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Fund

Name of transfer payment program:

Supporting Families fund (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2009

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Supporting Families Fund is a key component of the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative (SFI), which was announced by the Minister of Justice in September 2008 and launched on April 1, 2009. The Fund is aimed at facilitating access to the family justice system for families experiencing separation and divorce through various services, programs, and information resources, particularly those that promote compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. The Fund also supports projects that promote public awareness about parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system.

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments, agencies, or other organizations designated by provincial and territorial governments as responsible for child support, the enforcement of support orders and agreements and parenting arrangement programs and services, are eligible to apply for contribution funding under the Family Justice Initiatives and the Pilot Projects components of the Fund.

Any of the following may apply for contribution or class grant funding under the Fund's Public Legal Education and Information and Professional Training component:

  • individuals
  • non-profit professional organizations, societies or associations
  • other non-profit organizations, societies or associations
  • educational institutions
  • private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects in partnership with federal, provincial, or territorial governments
Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

Evaluation results concluded that the SFI continues to be relevant; is aligned with Justice Canada's strategic outcome and the federal government's mandate in relation to its legislative authority; achieved its objectives; and, has been administered economically and efficiently.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total grants $10,000 $0 $50,000 $0 $0 $50,000
Total contributions $15,989,910 $15,996,002 $15,950,000 $16,000,000 $15,999,842 $(49,842)
Total program $15,998,356 $15,996,002 $16,000,000 $16,000,000 $15,599,842 $158
Comments on variances:

Grants budget ($50,000) was transferred to Contributions budget to address funding requests which required contribution-type agreements, based on risk assessments.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The impact evaluation of the Supporting Families Initiative (SFI) was completed in 2013–14 andthe evaluation report is available from the Justice Canada website. http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/14/sfesd-sfvsd/p4a.html

Engagement of applicants and recipients:
  • Continued to provide information to the applicants by posting funding information on the Justice Canada website and via telephone and e-mail;
  • Continued to obtain feedback from funding recipients to improve program funding process;
  • Continued to respond to questions from funding recipients via telephone, e-mail or face to face meetings regarding proposal development and throughout the funding process; and
  • Through the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO)-Family Justice Committee, continued to seek feedback and collaboration from provincial and territorial governments and recipients of family justice services funding on funding criteria, final reporting template and collection of program data for the purpose of the Impact evaluation of the SFI. The Committee serves as a forum for discussing the SFI as well as any cross-jurisdictional family justice issues that arise. During 2013–2014, discussions of the CCSO-Family Justice Committee included the renewal of the program.

Victims of Crime Initiative (Federal Victims Strategy)

Name of transfer payment program:

Victims Fund (Voted)

Start date:

Victims of Crime Initiative, April 1, 2000

Federal Victims Strategy, April 1, 2007

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Victims Fund is part of the Federal Victims Strategy that works to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice system. The Victims Fund provides grants and contributions to support projects and activities that encourage the development of new approaches, promote access to justice, improve the capacity of service providers, foster the establishment of referral networks, and/or increase awareness about the needs of victims of crime and services and legislation available to assist them.

Recipients: (a) individuals; (b) national, provincial, territorial, municipal, Aboriginal, community or professional organizations, societies or associations; (c) Canadian educational institutions/boards of education; (d) International governmental and non-governmental organizations, including bodies associated or affiliated with organizations of which Canada is a member, which have as their purpose victim advocacy, services, assistance or raising awareness about the impact of victimization; (e) private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects; (f) bands, tribal councils and self-governing First Nations who are working to provide services and assistance to victims of crime in Aboriginal communities; (g) provincial, territorial, municipal and regional governments and agencies.

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

In 2013–2014, the Victims Fund provided funding for a total of $10.7M to:

  • 19 organizations to establish or enhance Child Advocacy Centres;
  • 11 organizations in support of concrete measures on missing and murdered Aboriginal women;
  • 10 organizations to help them maintain services by covering operating expenses;
  • fund projects across Canada to deliver services to victims and/or raise awareness about victim issues;
  • provinces and territories to support the development, enhancement and delivery of victim services;
  • support of community events to mark National Victims of Crime Awareness Week 2013;
  • 325 victims (including support persons) to attend Parole Board of Canada hearings; and
  • 61 Canadians victimized abroad (including support persons).

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total grants $977,052 $2,220,982 $3,250,000 $2,300,000 $1,745,910 $1,504,090
Total contributions $6,922,787 $8,573,011 $8,253,223 $9,203,223 $8,929,669 $(676,446)
Total program $7,899,839 $10,793,993 $11,503,223 $11,503,223 $10,675,579 $827,644
Comments on variances:

The Department pursued its efforts to reach as many applicants as possible. The Departments works diligently with applicants to ensure that funding proposals received meet the objectives and priorities of the Victims Fund. Past efforts have yielded positive results: provincial and territorial governments are accessing available resources; there is increased demand for funds for activities under the National Victims of Crime Awareness Week and for projects related to Child Advocacy Centres and families of missing or murdered Aboriginal women; and a high demand for time-limited operational funding. The variance between the planned and actual spending can be attributed to the fact that many projects received during the fiscal year required a more in-depth review and, as a consequence, were not recommended for funding in 2013–2014.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

A summative evaluation of the Federal Victims Strategy was completed in 2010 and concluded that the Federal Victims Strategy is aligned with the Government of Canada priorities and that the Policy Centre for Victim Issues achieves high results at a low cost. The evaluation is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/11/fvs-sfv/index.html and http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/11/sfv-fvs/index.html. The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 2015-2016

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

The Department continued its outreach efforts with applicants and recipients through various means including:

  • Providing information to potential applicants by posting funding information on the Department's website and via telephone and e-mail;
  • Responding to questions from funding applicants and recipients via telephone, e-mail or face to face meetings regarding proposal development and throughout the funding process;
  • Obtaining direct feedback from funding recipients through surveys to improve the program funding process;
  • Promoting the Victims Fund at meetings with stakeholders, criminal justice associations, and with criminal justice system partners;
  • Promoting the Victims Fund in Policy Centre for Victim Issues (PCVI) publications and newsletters; and,
  • Regular communication with the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Victims of Crime to engage key partners in meeting the objectives of the Federal Victims Strategy and the Victims Fund.

Youth Justice Services – Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program

Name of transfer payment program:

Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2002

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist the provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other sentencing options applicable under the Act to serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems. It is expected that these services might reduce the likelihood of further violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences.

Recipients: Provinces and territories

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

Through the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) Funding Program, provinces and territories were supported in providing a range of youth justice programs and services that target young persons in conflict with the law. Specifically for the IRCS Program, federal funding was provided towards specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) and other sentencing options applicable under the Act for serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems (exceptional cases). During 2013–14, a total of six (6) IRCS orders were issued by the courts and became eligible for federal funding, bringing the total number of active IRCS cases funded to forty-three (43). In addition, another ten (10) exceptional cases were approved for funding during 2013–14, bringing the total number of active exceptional cases to fifteen (15). In 2013–14, IRCS funding agreements were implemented with all provinces and territories for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total contributions $10,701,290 $10,872,387 $11,048,000 $11,003,783 $10,770,273 $277,727
Total program $10,701,290 $10,872,387 $11,048,000 $11,003,783 $10,770,273 $277,727
Comments on variances:

Spending under this program largely depends on sentences imposed under section 42(r) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and applications for Other Exceptional Case funding and as such remains unpredictable. The IRCS program plans its budget, in part, based on a projected number of applications and orders from provincial and territorial governments. In 2013–14, the program received less applications and orders than were expected resulting in a variance (surplus).

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Following a successful renewal in 2012–2013, IRCS Program funding agreements were implemented with all provinces and territories for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act

Name of transfer payment program:

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2002

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Contraventions Act allows the federal government to designate federal statutory offences as contraventions so that they can be processed using a ticketing regime, thus reducing the burden on the court system, reducing the costs for the accused and the government, and limiting the impact of a conviction based on a federal offence. The Act authorizes the federal government to sign administration agreements with provinces, territories and municipalities allowing the federal government to use existing provincial penal regimes to prosecute federal contraventions. The Contraventions Act Fund provides funding to provinces, territories and municipalities that have signed administration agreements so that they can implement the Act in a manner consistent with the applicable constitutional language rights laws involving compliance with judicial services (section 530 and 530.1 of the Criminal Code) and extrajudicial services (Part IV of the Official Languages Act).

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments and agencies and municipalities designated by provincial and territorial governments as being responsible for judicial activities and for providing extrajudicial services in both official languages.

Strategic outcome:

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results achieved:

Negotiations continued with Newfoundland and Labrador and Saskatchewan towards the conclusion of a Contraventions Act Administration and Enforcement Agreements, with provisions for measures supported by the Contraventions Act Fund to ensure language rights are respected. Given provincial priorities, agreements are yet to be signed. The Contraventions Act is implemented in seven provinces, which means that over 80% of the Canadians now reside in a province where persons who have received a federal contravention are guaranteed access to the justice system in the official language of their choice. To date, no complaints have been made regarding non-compliance.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

  2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Actual spending
2013–14
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
Variance
Total contributions $4,929,750 $5,040,634 $9,094,900 $8,656,026 $4,938,711 $4,156,189
Total program $4,929,750 $5,040,634 $9,094,900 $8,656,026 $$4,938,711 $4,156,189
Comments on variances:

Only provinces/territories/municipalities are eligible for funding under the Fund. Justice Canada continues to work diligently to move negotiations forward towards getting the provinces/territories/municipalities to sign Contraventions Act administration and enforcement agreements containing language rights provisions supported by the Fund; however, negotiations and anticipated and actual progress depend largely on the priorities and therefore capacity of the provinces. Only when all jurisdictions will have signed agreements will the Fund be completely committed.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The evaluation, completed in March 2012, is available on the departmental website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/12/loe-ole/index.html and http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/12/ole-loe/index.html. The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 2016-2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

In 2013–2014, discussions were held with eight jurisdictions in regard to signing new administration agreements that reflect the latest federal government policies and practices as well as the current official languages environment. The discussions provided the Department with the opportunity to become better acquainted with issues that the provinces face in administering and enforcing federal contraventions and in providing judicial and extrajudicial services in both official languages with support from the Contraventions Act Fund. The discussions also provided an opportunity for the Department's provincial partners, those that receive funding from the Contraventions Act Fund, to revisit their measures that they undertake to guarantee language rights on behalf of the federal government to ensure that they meet the needs of official minority language communities.

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