2016–17 Departmental Results Report - Supplementary Information Tables

Horizontal Initiatives

*In December 2016, the Government of Canada announced the new Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy, led by the Minister of Health, to replace the National Anti-Drug Strategy.

General information

Name of horizontal initiative
National Anti-Drug Strategy
Lead department(s)
Department of Justice Canada
Federal partner organization(s)
  • Health Canada;
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research;
  • Public Safety Canada;
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police;
  • Correctional Service Canada;
  • Parole Board of Canada;
  • Public Prosecution Service of Canada;
  • Canada Border Services Agency;
  • Global Affairs Canada;
  • Canada Revenue Agency;
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada; and
  • Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.
Non‑federal and non‑governmental partner(s)
not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative

2007-08 (First year of the National Anti-Drug Strategy)

First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12)

Second reporting cycle (2012-13 to 2016-17)

End date of the horizontal initiative
2016-17 and Ongoing
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12): $563,400,000

Second reporting period (2012-13 to 2016-17): $568,978,326

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12): $585,160,970

Second reporting cycle (2012-13 to 2016-17): $554,549,225

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12): $453,787,468

Second reporting cycle (2012-13 to 2016-17): $592,455,065

Funding contributed by non‑federal and non‑governmental partners
not applicable
Governance structures

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC) and Director General level working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure was supported by the Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section of the Department of Justice Canada until the Government of Canada announced its new drug strategy, the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) in December 2016, which rebrands and strengthens the National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS). Moving forward, the governance structure will fall under the responsibility of Health Canada given the transfer of the drug strategy to the Minster of Health. The CDSS takes a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidenced-based approach to drug policy.

Under NADS, the ADMSC was responsible for overseeing the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions and makes recommendations for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate. It also oversees the work of the four Director General-level working groups.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans, as well as the work of a Prevention and Treatment Sub-Working Group. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan, as well as the work of a new Sub-Committee on Information Sharing and Surveillance. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy, as well as the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy, which includes making the decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative to the public and stakeholder groups and ensuring coordination of such communications. It also oversees the work of a Communications Sub-Working Group.

Contact information
Danièle Ménard
National Anti-Drug Strategy
Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section
Justice Canada
(613) 954-2730
Daniele.Menard@justice.gc.ca

Results information

Description of the horizontal initiative

The NADS was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Through Speech from the Throne 2013 and Economic Action Plan 2014, the Government of Canada expanded the Strategy to include prescription drug abuse. The goal of the Strategy is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse, treat dependency, and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The Prevention Action Plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs and abusing prescription drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects, and to develop and implement community-based interventions and initiatives. The Treatment Action Plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The Enforcement Action Plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations. Under the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS), Harm Reduction is formerly restored as a fourth pillar, supporting measures that reduce the negative consequences of drug and substance use. Results under Harm Reduction will be reported on moving forward.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2022-23, to be led by Health Canada
Shared outcome of federal partners
  • Reduced prescription drug abuse in Canada;
  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced negative health and social impacts and crime related to illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), Departmental files, component evaluations

Ongoing research and trends/analysis

Results
In 2016-17, the 13 federal partner departments and agencies involved in NADS (now known as the CDSS) continued their work to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependence, and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs. In addition, work was also undertaken to address prescription drug abuse and the opioid crisis.
Expected outcome or result of non‑federal and non‑governmental partners
not applicable
Planning Information
Federal organizations Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Link to department’s Strategic Outcomes Link to government priorities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2016–17 Planned spending (dollars) 2016–17 Actual spending (dollars) 2016–17 Expected results 2016–17 Actual results
Department of Justice Canada Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

Drug Treatment Court Funding Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity $18,156,380 $3,631,276 $3,646,000 [ER 1.1] [AR 1.1]

Youth Justice Fund

(Treatment Action Plan)

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity $7,907,470 $1,581,494 $1,378,843 [ER 1.2] [AR 1.2]
Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity $1,167,070 $233,414 $257,542 [ER 1.3] [AR 1.3]

Internal Services

Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity $1,109,090 $221,818 $208,044 [ER 1.3] [AR 1.3]

National Anti-Drug Strategy 

(Treatment Action Plan)

Internal Services Not applicable $199,945 $39,989 $39,989 [ER 1.4] [AR 1.4]

Health Canada

Controlled Substances

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP)Table note i

(Prevention & Treatment Action Plans)

Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable $128,352,048 $22,787,514 $19,230,736 [ER 2.1] [AR 2.1]
First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions

National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status Not applicable $58,357,585 $12,071,517 $10,458,527 [ER 2.2] [AR 2.2]

Controlled Substances

Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable $31,221,420 $6,244,284 $13,718,029 [ER 2.3] [AR 2.3]

Transfer to Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable $9,753,510 $1,950,702 $1,950,702 [ER 2.3] [AR 2.3]
Controlled Substances / First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions

Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable $54,487,945 $10,765,013 $10,765,013 [ER 2.4] [AR 2.4]

Prescription Drug Abuse

(Prevention Action Plan)

Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable $21,373,737 $9,691,866 $9,873,225 [ER 2.5] [AR 2.5]
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Horizontal Health Research Initiatives

Research on Drug Treatment Models

(Treatment Action Plan)

Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge Not applicable $7,874,990 $1,974,998 $2,267,851 [ER 3.1] [AR 3.1]
Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement

National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)

A Safe and Resilient Canada: Countering Crime (1.3) Security and opportunity $3,224,290 $609,858 $390,634 [ER 4.1] [AR 4.1]
Internal Services Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $75,710 $15,142 $15,142 [ER 4.2] [AR 4.2]
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (formerly Drugs and Organized Crime)Table note ii

Federal Policing Public Engagement (FPPE)

(Prevention Action Plan)

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced Legalization and regulation of marijuana $12,500,000 $2,200,000 $2,200,000 [ER 5.1] [AR 5.1]

Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced Legalization and regulation of marijuana $94,600,000 $16,700,000 $16,700,000 [ER 5.2] [AR 5.2]
Internal Services Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $12,600,000 $2,900,000 $2,900,000    
Correctional Service Canada Correctional Interventions

Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders

(Enforcement Action Plan)

The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety Safe and Secure Communities $5,953,677 $627,369 $627,369 [ER 6.1] [AR 6.1]
Community Supervision

Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders

(Enforcement Action Plan)

The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety Safe and Secure Communities $2,170,239 $1,224,327 $1,224,327 [ER 6.1] [AR 6.1]
Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release Decisions

Conditional Release Decisions

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Conditional Release Decisions Safe and Secure Canada $5,557,500 $1,111,500 $223,342 [ER 7.1] [AR 7.1]
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Safe and Secure Canada $2,137,500 $427,500 $92,898 [ER 7.2] [AR 7.2]
Internal Services Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $1,710,000 $342,000 $44,494 [ER 7.3] [AR 7.3]
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program

Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Criminal and regulatory offences under federal law are prosecuted by the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions in an independent, impartial and fair manner. Not applicable $15,596,460 $3,119,292 $20,494,834 [ER 8.1] [AR 8.1]
Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program

Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Criminal and regulatory offences under federal law are prosecuted by the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions in an independent, impartial and fair manner. Not applicable $33,182,275 $6,636,455 $2,812,501 [ER 8.2] [AR 8.2]
Internal Services

Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Internal Services Not applicable $2,345,825 $469,165 $2,497,908 [ER 8.3] [AR 8.3]

Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Internal Services Not applicable $4,863,660 $972,732 $341,708 [ER 8.3] [AR 8.3]
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment

Targeting Intelligence Security Screening

(Enforcement Action Plan)

International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks. Security and Opportunity $9,800,000 $2,100,000 $2,100,000 [ER 9.1] [AR 9.1]
Criminal Investigations

Targeting Intelligence Security Screening

(Enforcement Action Plan)

International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks. Security and Opportunity $1,400,000 $200,000 $200,000 [ER 9.2] [AR 9.2]
Internal Services Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $8,800,000 $1,300,000 $1,300,000 [ER 9.3] [AR 9.3]
Global Affairs Canada Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements

Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages. Security and Opportunity $4,500,000 $900,000 $900,000 [ER 10.1] [AR 10.1]
Canada Revenue Agency Domestic Compliance

Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate

(Enforcement Action Plan)

Tax: Canadian obtain services and information that are accessible, timely, useful, and fair Not applicable $5,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,695,407 [ER 11.1] [AR 11.1]
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services

Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)

FAMG, like the department of Public Services and Procurement Canada upholds public confidence in government wide business and ensures government carries out its operations with transparency and fairness, probity and sound management practices and with the highest standards of professionalism and integrity Security and Opportunity $3,000,000 $600,000 $600,000 [ER 12.1] [AR 12.1]
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Financial Intelligence Program

Financial Intelligence Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

A Canadian financial system resistant to money laundering and terrorist financing Not applicable $0 $0 $700,000 [ER 13.1] [AR 13.1]
Total for all federal organizations         $568,978,326 $114,649,225 $131,855,065    
Table note i

In FY 2016-17, Health Canada received approval to change the name of the Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (ADSI) funding program, which consolidated the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) and Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) to the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP). The SUAP continues to contribute to both the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans of the NADS.

Return to table note i referrer

Table note ii

Under the new RCMP Federal Policing (FP) Service Delivery Model, the resources allocated to NADS activities and to all other FP-specific or horizontal-related initiatives are delivered through broader FP teams across the country. This flexible model allows FP to better align resources to the highest priorities and thereby to conduct its business more efficiently. Consequently, it is expected that in any given year FP's allocation of funds to NADS activities will fluctuate in line with evolving priorities.

Return to table note ii referrer

Expected Results

Department of Justice Canada

ER 1.1

Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court participants.

ER 1.2

To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.

To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options in communities for youth involved in the youth justice system.

To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

ER 1.3

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment, and enforcement, and prescription drug abuse through:

  • Exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • Maintaining the Strategy’s governance structure;
  • Leading and coordinating all National Anti-Drug Strategy communications activities; and
  • Taking lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation and performance reporting.
ER 1.4

Support the work of Justice programs by providing key corporate services.

Health Canada

ER 2.1

In December 2014, the Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (ADSI) was created, which consolidated two previous Health Canada contribution funding programs - the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) and the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP), into one joint fund. ADSI will continue to deliver the National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) Prevention and Treatment Action Plan mandates. Reporting on ADSI has commenced in 2015-16, as specified in the 2015-16 RPP. DSCIF and DTFP figures reflect Grants & Contributions funding only.

Through the Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives Program, Health Canada will continue to deliver the National Anti-Drug Strategy Prevention and Treatment Action Plan mandates for illicit and prescription drug abuse. A call for proposals for substance abuse initiatives will be launched in 2016-17.

ER 2.2

Health Canada, through the First Nations Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB), plans to increase the availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by the nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices. FNIHB also plans to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address drug dependency in First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need.

Total Allocation and Planned Spending increased from figures reported in the 2015-16 Reports on Plans and Priorities for National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) to reflect renewed funding received for Mental Wellness Teams under NADS. Mental Wellness Teams are recognized as a key initiative resulting from planning and policy development partnerships with National Aboriginal Organizations.

ER 2.3

Health Canada, through the Office of Controlled Substances (OCS), will renew and enhance the robustness and transparency of its processes to authorize and issue licenses, permits, registrations, and authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances, precursor chemicals, and industrial hemp. Health Canada will also continue working with partners and regulated parties to reduce the risk of diversion of controlled substances, precursor chemicals by promoting and monitoring compliance with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations.

ER 2.4

Health Canada, through the Drug Analysis Services (DAS), plans to increase effectiveness in gathering, analyzing, and sharing intelligence and analyzing evidence related to clandestine laboratories and drug analyses. DAS will also increase awareness of illicit drug and precursor chemical issues for enforcement officials through targeted training, increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations, reduce risks associated with illicit drug production, and improve intelligence and evidence gathering.

ER 2.5

The Prescription Drug Abuse (PDA) TB Submission provided five year funding (2014-15 to 2018-19) for the Health Portfolio of $44.3M. PDA's approved allocation for the five-year period being reported (2012-13 to 2016-17) is $21.4M.

Health Canada will continue to engage provinces and territories to advance collaborative efforts to combat prescription drug abuse (PDA). Health Canada will serve as the secretariat for the F/P/T Prescription Monitoring Program Network, which will facilitate the creation of new prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) and enhance existing PMPs through sharing best practices, data, advice, and mentoring. The department will also fund and oversee the Canadian Institute for Health Information's efforts to develop a national approach to prescription drug surveillance.

Health Canada, through the Office of Drug Science and Surveillance (ODSS) will improve research and data analysis to support work on PDA, and will expand internal monitoring and reporting on PDA. ODSS will continue working on the costs of the PDA project, developing methodology and adding new data sources as they become available.

In an effort to contribute to the prevention of PDA, the marketing campaign, led by the Communications and Public Affairs Branch (CPAB), Health Canada will continue to increase awareness about the harms and risks associated with PDA among parents and youth, and educate Canadians on the importance of safely storing, monitoring, and disposing of prescription drugs.

Health Canada, through the FNIHB, will continue to enhance prevention and treatment capacity for PDA in First Nations communities across Canada. Priority areas will include: PDA-specific crisis intervention teams in Manitoba and Saskatchewan First Nation communities; increased case management supports in select treatment centres and First Nations communities; and, increased access to PDA prevention training.

Health Canada, through the Office of Controlled Substances and the Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch (RORB), is undertaking inspections of pharmacies across Canada to ensure the security of pharmaceuticals contained in these facilities and minimize the potential diversion of these drugs for illicit use. Health Canada is also updating and disseminating drug destruction guidelines for law enforcement and pharmacies to ensure appropriate collection, handling, and disposal of unused or expired pharmaceuticals.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 3.1

In 2016-17, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will continue to fund the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) to undertake national studies of substance misuse research in Canada. Recipients of the Prescription Drug Abuse Knowledge Synthesis grants will implement their research, supporting partnerships between researchers and knowledge users to produce scoping reviews and syntheses that respond to the information needs of knowledge users in the area of prescription drug abuse.

In 2016-17, CIHR will also implement a governance and reporting strategy to provide appropriate oversight of CRISM based on CIHR’s Governance Strategy for CIHR-funded Major Initiatives. As part of this governance, two meetings will be held for the Executive Committee of the CRISM to provide a national coordination of the CRISM’s activities, including research priority setting, establishing common measure elements for trials, overseeing aspects of research ethics, defining a knowledge translation plan and assessing progression.

Additional information:

CIHR’s total allocation from 2012-13 to 2016-17 reflects the additional temporary funding received to address prescription drug abuse as per the 2014 Economic Action Plan.

Public Safety Canada

ER 4.1

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

ER 4.2

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 5.1

In 2016-17 the RCMP, through partnerships with internal and external departments, will increase awareness of organized crime in the illicit drug trade and the nature, extent and consequences of substance use and abuse among youth, professionals, and the general public.

ER 5.2

In 2016-17 the RCMP will continue initiatives that will assist in the disruption of organized criminal networks behind illegal drug enterprises.

Correctional Service Canada

ER 6.1

Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (Schedule II). In 2016-17, CSC expects to supervise approximately 45 provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II), approximately 30 of those with a residency requirement. It is expected that a total number of 840 case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) will be completed.

Parole Board of Canada

ER 7.1

This funding will provide the PBC the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result Mandatory Minimum Penalties (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

ER 7.2

This funding will provide PBC with the capacity to provide information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the Safe Streets and Communities Act (Mandatory Minimum Penalties). In a similar manner, PBC will report on the extent of involvement of victims and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC. Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

ER 7.3

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

ER 8.1

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of serious drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

ER 8.2

Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from mandatory minimum penalties.

ER 8.3

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 9.1

Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.

Continue to increase intelligence support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the Strategy.

Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting and information sharing related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

ER 9.2

Continue to conduct additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.

Continue to work collaboratively with other Law Enforcement Agencies (LEA) when goods that fall within the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) schedules are intercepted and a border nexus identified. Activities include gathering evidence at ports of entry to participation in controlled deliveries and joint investigations with partner LEA.

ER 9.3

Support the work of the CBSA programs by providing key corporate services.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 10.1

To assist UNODC in fulfilling its mandate in the fight against drugs and transnational crime ($0.8M).

To assist CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and crime in the Americas ($0.1M).

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 11.1

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re)assessment of $2.0M of federal taxes.

Leads will be obtained by the Criminal Investigations Directorate, from the RCMP, and from other enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities relating to illegal drug use, production, and distribution and forwarded to the Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate to be considered for audit.

Emphasis will continue to be placed on intelligence-led strategic file selection in an effort to reduce the profitability of illegal/criminal activities in this sector.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 12.1

Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

ER 13.1

FINTRAC will continue to be an unfunded partner within the National Anti-Drug Strategy. Given the importance of the Strategy, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions. FINTRAC will continue to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners.

Actual Results

Department of Justice Canada

AR 1.1

Drug Treatment Court (DTC) programs contribute to a reduction in criminal recidivism as well as a reduction in illicit drug use while in the program. Data collected through the Drug Treatment Court Information System show that drug treatment court participants are reducing their illicit drug use given that, in the 2016-2017, 59.8% of all urine drug tests on DTC participants were clean.

AR 1.2

A Call for Proposals under the Youth Justice Fund –Drug Treatment component resulted in 7 research projects being approved for funding in 2016-17. Five of these projects were approved for additional funding to implement pilot projects which build upon the results of the research. These projects are focused on adapting existing drug treatment programming in order to be more culturally relevant or implementing innovative approaches and/or best practice models for culturally relevant drug treatment interventions.

Service gaps have been identified and addressed through youth engagement in the research and development of pilot projects as youth reported a need for enhanced after care services once released into their communities.

Applications for pilot project funding are shared with our provincial and territorial counterparts. Project evaluations, results and deliverables, as well as research findings, are shared with internal and external stakeholders, including the provincial and territorial ministries responsible for youth justice services and programs.

AR 1.3

As the lead department responsible for the National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) until December 2016, Justice Canada provided effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment, and enforcement, and prescription drug abuse through:

  • Exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • Organizing senior-level committee meetings to discuss future activities, policy, communications, and evaluation and performance reporting;
  • Coordinating NADS communication activities, including making greater use of social media;
  • Continued to lead the horizontal evaluation of the Strategy;
  • Participating in domestic and international drug policy discussions with partner departments.

In addition, Justice Canada facilitated the transfer of NADS to the Minister of Health, following the Government of Canada’s December 2016 announcement to rebrand and strengthen its drug strategy. The new Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) replaces the NADS and formerly restores harm reduction as a key pillar alongside prevention, treatment and enforcement.

AR 1.4

Provided support to Justice programs through the provision of key corporate services.

Health Canada

AR 2.1

In terms of ongoing program delivery and support for prevention, treatment and harm reduction initiatives, the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) managed 57 ongoing or approved Grants and Contributions (G&Cs) funded projects in 2016-17. These included:

  • 11 projects with provincial and territorial governments funded under the former Drug Treatment Funding Program;
  • 34 projects with non-governmental organizations across Canada funded under the former Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund;
  • a cohort of 6 prescription drug focused projects funded under the former Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives funding program; and,
  • 1 agreement with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse.

In April 2016, the SUAP launched a targeted Call for Proposals which resulted in 5 new projects. New contribution agreements were signed with:the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health to develop a needs-based treatment planning model for jurisdictions across Canada; the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health on the integration of trauma- and gender-informed practices into substance use treatment services across Canada; the Canadian Public Health Association and the Centre for Addictions Research of BC to engage communities across Canada on issues related to cannabis use as well as on low-risk drinking and alcohol policy; and, the University of Waterloo for a project on school-based prevention. Two additional applications were approved prior to the end of the fiscal year, including one with the Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion for an initiative focused on the impact of low-risk drinking guidelines on alcohol containers and an initiative with the Canadian Academy of Geriatric Psychiatry on clinical guidelines for substance use among seniors.

A total of 46 out of the 57 projects in fiscal year 2016-17 ended by March 31, 2017. The SUAP implemented a new two-stage G&Cs intake process in the targeted call for proposals, aligned with a revised SUAP Program Framework, and designed a new Guide for Applicants to support improved (enhanced efficiency and effectiveness) delivery of the program.

In 2016-17, SUAP program staff worked collaboratively within the Health Portfolio as well as with partner departments and agencies connected to the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy. This included: delivery and management of the SUAP to support provincial/territorial (P/T) and community-based initiatives; policy advice and guidance provided to Health Canada’s Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) to support the transition of the NADS to the CDSS and Memorandums to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions related to the Standing Committee on Health (HESA) opioid report, harm reduction/opioids and cannabis; review committee collaboration between Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada; collaborating on the development of funding priorities; and working in close partnership with Health Canada’s Communications and Public Affairs Branch and HECSB on past and future collaborations around content and recommendations for substance use prevention fact sheets for youth, parents and other key stakeholders.

The SUAP team was also active in health portfolio and inter-departmental substance use related working groups and committees. Activities in 2016-17 included:

  • Sharing information and best practices for prevention and reporting on funded projects as members of the Health Portfolio Opioid Action Plan working group;
  • Providing SUAP related updates as an observer member on the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms (PSUH), the single table for F/P/T collaboration and actions on substance use issues;
  • Representing the SUAP on the Special Advisory Committee (SAC) on Opioids;
  • Representing the SUAP on the Health Portfolio Opioid Data Working Group;
  • Supporting the Canadian Centre on Substances Use and Addiction (CCSA) in its role as national conveners, including active participation in planning the National Opioid Summit and related CCSA working group activities; and,
  • Representing SUAP on the Health Portfolio Opioid Crisis Incident Response Structure to support emergency measures to address the opioid crisis response.  
AR 2.2

The annual Horizontal Initiative reporting cycle does not align with FNIHB funding recipients’ reporting processes. Thus, results achieved in 2016/17 by recipients of NADS funding were not available to inform the Departmental Results Report (DRR). However, FNIHB’s mental health and addictions programming continues to support activities to improve access to quality services for First Nations and Inuit communities:

  • Since 2007, 37 treatment centres have re-oriented or re-profiled their services to more effectively meet community needs (such as services for women, youth, or people with co-occurring mental health issues or prescription drug abuse issues);
  • More treatment centres achieving accreditation. In 2015-16, 86% of treatment centres were accredited. This has increased from 84% in 2014-15;
  • In 2015-16, the percentage of full-time, certified addiction treatment centre counsellors was 77%, up from 68% in 2010-11; and,
  • NADS funding has made available services like Mental Wellness Teams (MWTs), now located in all Health Canada regions. MWTs are community-based, client-centred, multi-disciplinary teams that provide a variety of culturally safe mental health and addictions services and supports to First Nations and Inuit communities. MWTs are defined and driven by the community and include Indigenous traditional, cultural, and mainstream clinical approaches to mental wellness services, which span the continuum of care from prevention to after-care.
AR 2.3

In 2016-17, Health Canada’s Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) continued its compliance and enforcement activities in administering the regulatory framework for controlled substances and precursor chemicals. Through the examination and analysis of options for a new risk based model, the organization aims to improve the department’s ability to target activities and allocate resources to areas that pose the highest risk. OCS worked to increase its analytical capacity to control and monitor controlled substances and precursor chemicals, by streamlining operational processes and establishing internal service standards.

Health Canada also continued to work with partners and regulated parties to reduce the risk of diversion of controlled substances and precursor chemicals by promoting and monitoring compliance with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations by developing a risked-based approach to inspection programs. Specifically, in 2016-17 Health Canada, through the Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch (RORB), delivered144 regular inspections and 75 targeted inspections of licensed dealers of controlled substances and precursors. Health Canada delivered 51 security inspections and 1165 witnessed and unwitnessed destructions (revenue funded).

In November 2016, Health Canada issued a Section 56 Class Exemption in Relation to the Industrial Hemp Regulations. The Exemption better aligns the regulation of industrial hemp with the demonstrated low public health and safety risk of the crop. The Exemption is an interim measure to simplify the licence application process as the Government moves forward with its commitment to legalize, strictly regulate, and restrict access to marijuana.

AR 2.4

In 2016-17, Health Canada, through the Drug Analysis Service (DAS) assisted Canadian law enforcement agencies by providing analysis results of 115,264 exhibits. 97.9% of the exhibits analyzed by DAS were returned to the clients prior the 60-days service standard or the date negotiated with the submitting agency when urgent analysis was requested. The average turnaround time for providing the analysis results to clients was 37 days. DAS contributed to increased safety in dismantling illicit drug operations by its involvement in 20 suspected clandestine laboratory cases. 100% of the clients were satisfied with support provided during the dismantlement operation of clandestine laboratories. The extent to which operations have been safely dismantled was assessed by tracking the number and nature of injuries and/or environmental risk caused by unsafe handling of chemicals. No injury and no incident that would have had an environmental impact were reported in 2016-2017 for clandestine laboratories where DAS provided assistance. DAS also provided training to over 600 law enforcement officers and first responders by delivering 42 training sessions across the country where 98.9% were satisfied with the training provided. 95.7% of training survey respondents reported an increase in the level of awareness of the danger and safety precautions necessary to safely dismantle illegal drug operations and 98.8% reported an increase in the level of awareness on illegal drug production and trends.

AR 2.5
  • Health Canada has served as the secretariat for the F/P/T Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) Network which continues to meet monthly. Key deliverables of the network include:
  • Establishing profiles of all PMPs in Canada to serve as baseline information on PMPs and help in identifying gaps and best practices;
  • Engaging with U.S. officials to learn from their experience with linking PMPs across jurisdictions, and to better understand how to implement mandatory requirements for checking PMPs prior to prescribing or dispensing monitored drugs;
  • Working with Canada Health InfoWay on their Prescribe IT project for a pan-Canadian e-prescribing solution, and how it will link with PMPs; and,
  • Developing a Key Elements document to outline best practices that are considered essential to the establishment and ongoing management of an effective PMP in Canada, and help to promote consistency and interoperability between PMPs across Canada.

The Network is an important vehicle for sharing and promoting best practices and for working towards having real-time, interoperable, electronic PMPs across the country that will improve prescribing practices and reduce the incidence of overprescribing and double doctoring.

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) has made significant progress on the Prescription Drug Abuse Project in the areas of public health surveillance, data on drug-related deaths and opioid prescribing trends.

For example:

  • The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care mandated that, as of April 1, 2017, all Ontario emergency departments will send data on opioid overdose visits to CIHI within 7 days. CIHI will send a weekly data cut to the ministry to support its public health response and policy development;
  • On March 1, 2017, CIHI facilitated the development of a pan-Canadian definition of opioid-related deaths at a meeting of provincial and territorial chief coroners and chief medical examiners. PHAC is using the definition to collect and report opioid death statistics. Data collection has already begun, with 8 provinces already submitting data; and,
  • • In summer 2017, CIHI will release a new analysis of provincial/territorial opioid prescribing trends. The analysis finds that, nationally, the number of prescriptions has increased slightly over the past 5 years but the amount of opioids dispensed per prescription has decreased. An analysis of patient-level data found that an increasing proportion of patients are on strong opioids.

Health Canada, through the Office of Drug Science and Surveillance (ODSS) performed research and data analysis to support work on PDA by: (a) creating the Opioid Data Working Group which initiated work on gap analysis and data inventory through monthly meetings held since December 2016; (b) performing regular and ad hoc analysis of prescription sales data (Quintiles IMS); (c) regular reporting of losses and thefts through the Controlled Drugs and Substances Database (CDSD); and, (d) reporting of substances and precursors seized by law enforcement.

In an effort to contribute to the prevention of PDA, the marketing campaign led by Health Canada's Communications and Public Affairs Branch (CPAB) continued to increase awareness about the harms and risks associated with PDA among parents and youth, and to educate Canadians on the importance of safely storing, monitoring, and disposing of prescription drugs.

In December 2016, the campaign was refocused to help address the rising opioid crisis in Canada. Recreational drug users were added to the campaign's target audiences (in addition to teens and their parents) and key messages were shifted to raise awareness on the risks of problematic opioid use, opioid addiction and related overdoses.

Campaign activities included:

  • Digital advertising to promote testimonial videos from November to December, 2016 which resulted in 708,000 video views and 127,000 visits to the web;
  • A second round of digital advertising in March 2017, which resulted in 53,000 visits to the website;
  • Changing the campaign landing page from Canada.ca/Drug Prevention to Canada.ca/Opioids to provide a "hub" for opioids-related content and information;
  • Creating opioid-specific web content to include information about naloxone;
  • Developing four new educational videos including:
    • Recognizing an opioid overdose and what to do
    • What is fentanyl?
    • What to do when you're prescribed an opioid
    • What to do when you have an opioid addiction.
  • Creating messaging, resources and outreach activities to support the Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act while it awaited Royal Assent; and,
  • Drafting an event-based marketing plan to reach teens, parents of teens and recreational drug users, for implementation in 2017-18.

Health Canada, through FNIHB, will continue to support prevention and treatment capacity for PDA in First Nations communities across Canada. FNIHB's NADS investments to address prescription drug abuse are being targeted to support prevention training, case management and crisis-intervention specific to prescription drug abuse in First Nations and Inuit communities.

Over this year, funding was targeted to case management and critical supports, and prevention training activities for service delivery workers in select communities across Canada. Also, a PDA crisis intervention team co-located in Saskatchewan and Manitoba was led by the Opaskwayak Cree Nation (MB) and the College of Physicians and Surgeons (SK) to bring additional support to targeted communities with support from First Nations and Inuit Health Regional Offices.

In 2016-17, Health Canada, through the Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch (RORB), delivered 256 targeted and 300 random pharmacy inspections across Canada to ensure the security of pharmaceuticals contained in these facilities and minimize the potential diversion of these drugs for illicit use.

Health Canada has also developed a draft guidance document for the appropriate collection, handling, and disposal of unused or expired pharmaceuticals. The document has been sent out for consultation and is expected to be released in the Fall 2017.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

AR 3.1

The four CRISM Nodes are well established and continue to grow. The Network reports it currently reaches an estimated 500 stakeholders including researchers, service providers, decision makers and people with lived experience. The CRISM Network has been working collaboratively on their first funded study, known as OPTIMA, a unique multicenter Canada-wide trial evaluating a new addiction care model that will potentially increase the appeal, adherence, and effectiveness of these treatments. The four Nominated Principal Investigators and their teams (the Nodes) are working together with the overarching objective of comparing different models of care involving both Canadian standard of care treatments in opioid addiction, namely methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone (also known as Suboxone).

Some positive unintended impacts arising through the funding of the Network, which is being recognized as a national research consortium of experts in substance misuse include:

  • Having drafted a guideline for British Columbia for the clinical management of opioid disorders, the CRISM leads were approached directly by the Minister of Health to undertake the work of adapting the British Columbia clinical guidelines on opioid use disorder to a national level;
  • Benedikt Fischer, as the Nominated Principal Investigator for the Ontario Node being appointed the a Senior Strategic Advisor to the Cannabis Secretariat;
  • The Network providing strategic advice to the Health Portfolio on opioids and cannabis related work including indicators, research gaps and priorities for research funding.

In 2016-17, the team developed their study protocol and standards (including manuals of operations, standard operating procedures and other clinical trial required documents and procedures) which are currently under Research Ethics Board review. This review is anticipated to be completed in August at which point the study can begin to recruit participants (an anticipated 276 individuals). In preparation for the study, CRISM coordinated and implemented a national meeting and training event for all trial research personnel in March 2016. Seven sites across Canada are confirmed to participate and are located in the following cities: Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Sudbury, and Montreal.

The CRISM Network Executive Committee (NEC) met for its third Annual Meeting which allowed for critical reflection on progress, achievements and impacts arising from the CRISM Network of research programs, capacity building and knowledge translation activities. The meeting also facilitated discussions on the functioning, governance and administration of the NEC, the Network and the Nodes. Additionally, CIHR provided feedback and guidance to the NEC based on annual reporting received from each Node in addition to the broader Network. This feedback highlighted a need for a greater emphasis to be placed on Network governance and requested that CRISM revisit their Governance and Reporting Strategy.

In 2016-17, CIHR also funded Prescription Drug Abuse Knowledge Synthesis grants for research supporting partnerships between researchers and knowledge users to produce scoping reviews and syntheses that respond to the information needs of knowledge users in the area of prescription drug abuse.

CIHR’s total allocation from 2012-13 to 2016-17 reflects the additional temporary funding received to address prescription drug abuse as per the 2014 Economic Action Plan.

Public Safety Canada

AR 4.1

In 2016-17, Public Safety (PS) actions included: contributing to the management of the opioid crisis in Canada; indirectly contributing to strengthening law enforcement capacity to drug enforcement; and indirectly contributing to the disruption of illicit drug operations, including organized crime. At the governing level, PS participated in the drafting and tabling of Bill C-37, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related amendments to other Acts, which received Royal Assent and became law on May 18, 2017. The Bill assists law enforcement and border officers in addressing the illicit drug crisis, particularly with regards to production and trafficking of synthetic and precursor drugs. For example, the Bill restricts pill presses and other devices used in the manufacturing of illicit drugs and amends the 30 gram or less mail exception from the Customs Act, granting border officers the authority to open international mail of any weight, should they suspect it to contain illicit drugs.

Further, PS participated in: the Federal Inter-Departmental Deputy Ministers Task Force on the Opioid Crisis, created in 2016 to provide senior-level oversight and strategic direction to deal with the opioid crisis; and the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses, created in December 2016 as a mechanism for public health collaboration and information sharing between jurisdictions related to the illicit opioid crisis.

Important measures for building law enforcement capacity included: the development by the CBSA and the RCMP of safety guidelines for frontline personnel to ensure the safe handling of substances suspected to contain opioids; program developed by the RCMP to equip frontline officers with naloxone kits to respond to accidental opioid exposure and overdoses; and specific modifications made by the CBSA to its enforcement database to better track and report on seizures of fentanyl and related substances.

In 2016-2017, PS provided input and participated in domestic and international fora, including: trilateral discussions with the United States and Mexico through the new North American Drug Policy Dialogue; renewal of Memorandum of Understanding between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Chinese Ministry of Public Security to enhance cooperation on combating organized crime between the two law enforcement agencies and to strengthen coordinated law enforcement actions in fighting international drug traffickers; the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime Commission on Narcotic Drugs and UN General Assembly; the G7; the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Regional Forum; and the sixtieth regular session of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission where the parties negotiated a Plan of Action for 2016-2020 on the Hemispheric Drug Problem.

AR 4.2

Supported the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

AR 5.1

The RCMP actively participated in the development of the new Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) that replaced the NADS in 2016. Under the CDSS, the RCMP delivered a range of awareness and prevention activities to law enforcement officers throughout Canada. This awareness campaign focussed on the current synthetic opioids crisis in Canada. The RCMP developed a Fentanyl Drug Lab Awareness Sheet that was distributed nationally to more than 2,000 serious and organized crime officers and landlord and rental associations. Additionally, a Fentanyl Fact Sheet was developed for awareness and educational purposes in consultation with the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction, and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. Twenty-two hundred (2,200) copies of the fact sheet were distributed to RCMP serious and organized crime officers nationwide. The RCMP drafted terms of reference and a governance strategy proposing a new working group for enhanced coordination and cooperation to develop drug awareness products and new initiatives.

The RCMP also continued to deliver drug prevention programs to youth, such as the Aboriginal Shield program. For example, in Saskatchewan, nine sessions trained 152 community facilitators. These facilitators then took the program to the community and trained 1,350 grade 5/6 students and 386 grade 7/8 students. Findings from the pre/post-test with students showed that 99.6% of the students reported increased knowledge about alcohol, tobacco and drugs.

During April and May, 2017, Federal Policing prevention and engagement officers in Ontario distributed the RCMP’s fentanyl information products to a range of community stakeholders, including various police community outreach teams, Imams representing several Muslim congregations, and to approximately 100 community members from the Dar Foundation in Oakville.

In Prince Edward Island, drug prevention activities included 51 community presentations/meetings.

In Nova Scotia provincial and federal resources collaborated to lead or participate in a variety of events including, Police Week (May 2016), Police Dog Service (PDS) drug detection presentations, as well as eight (8) fentanyl presentations.

In Nunavut (V Division), the RCMP delivered the DARE program 4 times to 260 participants. Officers in V Division also facilitated 50 drug awareness presentations to approximately 700 youth and adults.

In British Columbia, drug prevention programs, including DARE and PARTY, were offered to youth with some sessions focusing specifically on marijuana and fentanyl. Approximately 12,000 youth were reached through these presentations/sessions.

AR 5.2

The RCMP remained focused on enforcement initiatives identified in collaboration with federal government partners under CDSS. The RCMP continued to support enforcement aimed at reducing the availability, production and distribution of illegal synthetic drugs in Canada, thus addressing some of the overall influence of organized crime on drug trafficking in Canada. During the 2016-17 reporting period, there were several RCMP investigations across the country that included seizures of illicit substances including, but not limited to, methamphetamine, oxycodone, fentanyl, hydromorphone, codeine, cocaine and cannabis.

During the fiscal year, the RCMP represented Canada at the UN International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) Task Force on Chemical Precursors and New Psychoactive Substances. This task force provides the opportunity to meet with officials from over 28 different countries and international organizations and discuss illicit drug challenges. Of particular importance, this forum allowed Canada to engage with China and to offer support and assistance to address these issues.

In 2016-17, the RCMP also organized a synthetic drug workshop that brought together RCMP synthetic drug subject matter experts from all provinces to discuss the current situation and attempt to find solutions to specific challenges. Several recommendations were drafted following the meeting including one in relation to the respiratory protection equipment provided to RCMP personnel. The issue was brought to the attention of the National Policy Health and Safety Committee, leading to the development of a new Force wide program.

The Organized Crime (OC) Joint Operations Centre (JOC) was formed in February 2017 to enhance the Government of Canada's response to reduce the supply of opioids and organized crime-related offences and activities. One of the drivers to form the OCJOC is the fentanyl and synthetic opioid epidemic affecting Canadians. The OCJOC includes the RCMP (as the lead agency), CBSA and Canada Post Corporation. The OCJOC provides tactical support to opioids-related investigations and the threat-related activities of persons participating with OC groups.

Correctional Service Canada

AR 6.1

CSC receives $1.9M yearly to cover the cost associated with the case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II).

During 2016-17, CSC supervised on average 50 provincial offenders convicted of a Schedule II offence (drug offence), which is slightly higher than the average for 2015-16 (n=46). The residency rate for this population was 62% (n=31), slightly lower than the 2015-16 rate (65%). While the overall population of offenders convicted of a Schedule II offence (both incarcerated and in the community) has decreased, the proportion of supervised offenders in the community with a Schedule II offence has increased (46/159 or 29% in 2015-16 to 50/169 or 30% in 2016-17).

With respect to case preparation, a total of 792 case preparation reports (pre- and post- release) were completed in 2016-17 for the entire provincial population under CSC’s jurisdiction, representing a decrease of 20 completed case preparation reports from 2015-16. Extrapolating the number of case preparation reports completed in comparison to the number of provincial offenders convicted of a Schedule II offence (drug offence), an average of 85.3 case preparation reports (pre- and post- release) were completed for the target population.

Overall, the data is demonstrating that the number of provincial offenders under CSC’s jurisdiction has remained relatively constant in 2016-17, including the number of offenders being gradually transitioned through community-based accommodations, with only slight variations between type of offence (Schedule II vs other) and location. The proportion of provincial offenders with a Schedule II offence, compared to the overall supervised provincial population has increased by 1%.

Parole Board of Canada

AR 7.1

This funding provided the PBC with the capacity to effectively manage its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC collects information and reports on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole). Provincial parole reviews are by application only, and as such the number received varies from year to year and is not directly related to the total number of incarcerated offenders.

AR 7.2

This funding provided the PBC with the capacity to provide information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to decision registry as a result of offenders sentenced under the provisions of the legislation. In a similar manner, PBC reports on the extent of involvement of victims and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC. Provincial parole reviews are by application only, and as such the number received varies from year to year and is not directly related to the total number of incarcerated offenders. Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

AR 7.3

Supported the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

AR 8.1

The PPSC contributes to optimal investigation practices through the provision of pre-charge legal intervention/assistance/advice to members of the *RCMP and other police services. In 2016-2017, the PPSC provided 18,543 hours of pre-charge legal advice for new and carried over CDSA files relating to sections 5(1), 5(2), 6(1), 6(2), 7(1), 7(2) and 7.1. Moreover, the organization handled 23,353 NADS-related litigation files consisting of drug production and distribution offences. Of these, 20,763 included distribution offences, 601 included production offences, and an additional 1,328 files included both production and distribution offences. The remaining 661 files had not yet been updated at time of writing to indicate which CDSA charge applies.

It should be noted that most NADS files include charges other than those related to serious drug offences under the CDSA, mainly Criminal Code charges. In addition some NADS-related activity occurs in the context where it is not differentiated according to the individual file (e.g. docket court). As a result, the time entered on such files will constitute an overestimation of actual NADS-related activity. Since the time recorded on litigation files is not initiative- or charge-specific, it is not possible to specifically attribute an exact number of hours to specific charges.

AR 8.2

Of the aforementioned 23,353 NADS-related files, 1,437 files had minimum mandatory penalties totaling 2,546 charges. The PPSC dedicated 30,254, hours to the conduct of these files, including 479 hours of pre-charge legal advice.

AR 8.3

In 2016-17, the PPSC allocated 11% of overall NADS-related expenditures for corporate support to in-house legal staff.

*While the RCMP no longer has enhanced dedicated anti-drug teams, the PPSC provides pre-charge legal intervention/assistance/advice on drug prosecutions to members of the RCMP and other police services as required.

Canada Border Services Agency

AR 9.1

The Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA) has undertaken numerous projects and analytical products to promote situational awareness and operational intervention and disruption of drug smuggling in 2016-2017. The CBSA has successfully operationalized intelligence information resulting in a ratio of intelligence led seizures compared to non-intelligence led seizures (in dollars) at 16:1.

In 2016-2017, the CBSA made 18,731 drug seizures, valued at $404 million. This included 110 fentanyl seizures valued at $5.7 million.

In February 2017, the CBSA, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the Canada Post Corporation established a Joint Operations Center (JOC) to enhance the Government of Canada’s response to reduce the supply of opioids and organized crime (OC). The function of the JOC is to assist in the coordination of an effective and timely operational response to the importation, production, and trafficking of opioids and chemical precursors. The JOC will also provide tactical support to opioid related investigations and the threat-related activities of persons participating with these OC groups.

AR 9.2

In 2016-2017, the Science and Engineering Directorate (CBSA Laboratory) analyzed 7,863 suspected contraband substances (including precursor chemicals) and participated in a mobile laboratory operation at the Vancouver International Mail Center. Overall, 155 exhibits were found to contain CDSA Class A or Class B precursors and numerous other exhibits were found to contain unregulated precursor chemicals.

There was a continued increase in the number of opioid-related exhibits such as fentanyl, and fentanyl analogues in 2016-2017. Due (in part) to challenges and restrictions associated with opening and field testing packages suspected to contain such highly toxic materials, the volume of suspected drug and precursor samples received by the CBSA Laboratories increased by 43% in 2016-2017 and resulted in a large backlog of work.

The CBSA Laboratory also programmed the lonscan 500DT to detect fentanyl and seven other opioids and investigated the challenges for non-scientists to sample fentanyl powder from packages, and the usefulness of using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) in the field.

The CBSA worked closely with Border Five (B5) partners to increase communication and targeting efforts resulting in increased interdictions across B5 countries. In 2016-2017, 38% of CBSA’s illicit narcotic seizures made in the air passenger mode were attributed to the work of the Agency’s National Targeting Center (NTC). The CBSA also worked with regional counterparts to increase information sharing and identification of possible associated illicit shipments/entities entering/departing Canada.

AR 9.3

The CBSA continued to provide key corporate services, such as training, to support this program.

Global Affairs Canada

AR 10.1

The Annual Voluntary Contribution funding to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has supported the implementation of the Container Control Programme (CCP) across 15 countries in the Americas (including Caribbean). The CCP improves the capacity of port authorities to risk profile, detect and intercept containers that are being used by transnational organized crime for trafficking, while at the same time facilitating legitimate maritime trade. In FY 2016-2017 new port control units were established in El Salvador, Honduras, and Cuba and the CCP seized over 43 tons of cocaine.

The Annual Voluntary Contribution funding provided to the Organization of American States (OAS) Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) has strengthened CICAD’s ability to fulfil its respective mandate to fight against drugs and international crime at the hemispheric level, more specifically the money laundering aspects of crime. Global Affairs Canada funding has supported the implementation of a project targeting anti-money laundering in LAC, with a particular focus of training law enforcement, prosecution, and judges in special investigative techniques and evidence in the prosecution and adjudication of money-laundering cases. In FY 2016-2017, the project delivered two regional trainings in Costa Rica and Panama, covering Central American countries. This will increase both the body of knowledge amongst stakeholders as well as facilitate regional cooperation and networks.

All of the above have added support to the efforts to reduce the flow of illicit drugs into Canada, and have benefited Canadian and international security by hindering the activities of drug trafficking organizations.

Canada Revenue Agency

AR 11.1

41 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re)assessments of $9.0 million of federal taxes, including penalties.

Leads were obtained by the Criminal Investigations Directorate via their Liaison Officers, from the RCMP, and from other enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities relating to illegal drug use, production and distribution and forwarded to the Small and Medium Enterprise Directorate for audit.

High quality referrals resulted in a higher than expected expenditures and results.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

AR 12.1

The Forensic Accounting Management Group utilized three resources (Senior Forensic Accountants) with the funding received from the NADS program. These resources helped to increase the overall operational capacity of the NADS files and increase the forensic accounting services provided to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of a suspect were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

AR 13.1

FINTRAC maintains productive working relationships with its police, law enforcement and national security partners in order to ensure that its financial intelligence is relevant, valuable and closely aligned with their priorities. Over the past year, FINTRAC conducted more than 190 outreach visits and presentations to regime partner organizations. These presentations highlight how financial intelligence can support investigations, including in relation to the distribution or production of drugs.

In 2016-17, FINTRAC made 2,015 disclosures of actionable financial intelligence to its police, law enforcement, national security and other partner agencies, including 413 unique cases that related to at least one drug-related offence. These case disclosures relate to suspicions of money laundering or terrorist financing where the predicate offence is believed to be drug distribution or production.

Date modified: