2016–17 Departmental Results Report - Supplementary Information Tables

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

TPPs exceeding $5 million during the reporting year

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2003
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2009-2010
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.6 Justice in Official Languages

Description
The Fund’s objectives are to increase the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer justice services in both official languages and to increase awareness in the legal community and official language minority and majority communities concerning their rights and issues related to access to justice in both official languages. It aims to facilitate access to justice in both official languages by providing grants and contributions to eligible organizations in support of activities such as legal information and workshops to members of the public, the creation of legal and linguistic tools, as well as the development of workshops and training for bilingual lawyers and stakeholders of the justice system, and the development of related training material.
Results achieved

The Department continued to work with its partners to improve access to justice in both official languages. In 2016-2017, funding was directed towards 48 projects aiming to increase the awareness among Canadians and the legal profession about issues relating to official languages in official language minority communities, and to improve the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer services in both official languages.

  • 14 projects supported training for justice professionals (including provincially appointed judges, provincial crown attorneys, probation officers, legal aid lawyers, judicial interpreters and clerks) to improve their capacity to deliver services in both official languages.
  • 24 projects aimed to raise awareness and support public legal information activities to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages. For example, five of these projects supported the creation and operation of legal information centres in Ottawa, Halifax, Regina, Edmonton and Winnipeg. These innovative hubs offer public assistance in dealing with legal issues by providing legal information in a timely and well-informed manner. Funding was also allocated to public legal education and information portals such as Éducaloi and cliquezjustice.ca to provide legal information to official language minority communities across the country in the official language of their choice.
  • Four projects contributed to the development of an academic curriculum for bilingual students interested in pursuing a career in the field of justice.
  • Six projects focused on developing linguistic training tools, including the Jurisource.ca portal which provide legal and jurilinguistic resources to justice professionals working with official language minority communities.
Comments on variances
The Department continued to work diligently with funding applicants, ensuring that funding proposals met the objectives and priorities of the Support Fund. The overall lapse was minimal and demonstrates the success of the Department’s approach.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages is currently underway and will be completed in 2017-2018.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces, territories, universities, courts, non-governmental organizations, and other key stakeholders.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
Throughout the year, the Department actively engages its network of stakeholders from official language minority communities through different channels such as conference calls, online newsletter, working groups (Federal-Provincial-Territorial and Advisory) and in-person consultations.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 139,070 197,275 600,000 245,554 83,965 (516,035)
Total contributions 6,225,962 6,268,735 5,892,845 6,247,291 6,247,291 354,446
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 6,365,032 6,466,010 6,492,845 6,492,845 6,331,256 (161,589)

Indigenous Justice Program Fund (formerly Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund)

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Indigenous Justice Program Fund (formerly Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 1991, as the Aboriginal Justice Initiative, renewed as the Aboriginal Justice Strategy in 1996, 2002, 2007, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015.
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2011-2012
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.5 Indigenous and Northern Justice

Description

The Indigenous Justice Program (IJP) (formerly Aboriginal Justice Strategy) supports Indigenous community-based justice programs that offer alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. Programs are community-led and designed to reflect the culture, values and specific needs of the communities in which they are situated.

Objectives of the IJP are to assist Indigenous people in assuming greater responsibility for the administration of justice in their communities; to reflect and include Indigenous values within the justice system; and to contribute to a decrease in the rate of victimization, crime and incarceration among Indigenous people in communities with community-based justice programs funded by the IJP.

Results achieved

85% of individuals referred to a program supported by the IJP complete the program. The percentage of individuals referred to the IJP who have completed the program is lower than its 90% target for the following reasons: 1) clients who are referred do not always participate; 2) circumstances beyond clients’ control (e.g. lack of resources or unsuitable matters); 3) clients are unable to successfully complete all aspects of the diversion (e.g. there is no programming available); and, 4) client processes are ongoing and have not been fully completed.

Evaluation findings (completed in 2016-2017) found that approximately $20.5M in immediate and future cost savings to the mainstream justice system were achieved through IJP-supported programs. Furthermore, a recidivism study found that rates of re-offending for individuals who completed a community-based justice program are significantly lower than those who did not participate.

Comments on variances
N/A
Audits completed or planned
2019-2020
Evaluations completed or planned
The evaluation of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy was completed in 2016-2017. An evaluation of the Indigenous Justice Program (formerly the Aboriginal Justice Strategy) is planned for completion in 2021-2022.
General targeted recipient groups
Community-Based Justice Fund:
(a) First Nations, bands, Tribal Councils, local, regional and national Indigenous organizations; (b) regional/municipal governments including their agencies and institutions; (c) non-profit community organizations, societies, and associations which have voluntarily associated themselves for a non-profit purpose; and, (d) provincial and territorial governments (in the case of flow-through agreements).
Capacity-Building Fund:
(a) First Nations, bands, Tribal Councils, local, regional and national Indigenous organizations; (b) regional/municipal governments including their agencies and institutions; (c) non-profit community organizations, societies, and associations which have voluntarily associated themselves for a non-profit purpose; (d) provincial and territorial governments; (e) individuals; and, (f) for-profit corporations, so long as these corporations will not make a profit on the work performed.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department, in partnership with provincial and territorial governments, provides direct support to 197 community-based justice programs that serve over 750 urban, rural, and Northern communities, both on- and off-reserve. As such, there is engagement on a regular/daily basis.

The IJP also financially supports annual regional gatherings and conducts regular engagement sessions that are aimed at continuing the conversation with recipients, Indigenous communities and other justice stakeholders to strengthen relationships and gather information in support of Government of Canada priorities.

Current and potential recipients as well as applicants are also engaged in an indirect way through the IJP’s website, social media, telephone and email.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 0
Total contributions 12,551,752 12,900,000 12,650,000 13,531,043 13,531,043 881,043
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 12,601,752 12,950,000 12,700,000 13,581,043 13,581,043 881,043

Legal Aid Systems

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Legal Aid Systems (Voted)
Start date
August 17, 1971
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2014-2015
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.1 Criminal Justice and Legal Representation

Description
The objective of the federal Legal Aid Program is to contribute to sustaining a national system of justice that helps to ensure that economically disadvantaged persons have access to the justice system, through contribution funding to the provinces in support of criminal, youth criminal and immigration and refugee legal aid services. Funding for criminal and civil legal aid in the territories is provided through the Access to Justice Services Agreements.
Results achieved
Provinces were enabled to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.
Comments on variances

Budget 2016 provides $88 million over five years, starting in 2016–17, to increase funding in support of the provision of criminal legal aid in Canada. From that amount, the program received $8.555 million in 2016-2017.

Also, $7.25 million has been made available in 2016-17 through transfers to assist in addressing increased demand for Immigration and refugee legal aid services in Ontario and British Columbia.

Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of the Legal Aid Program was recently completed in 2016-2017. The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2021-2022.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
Ongoing meetings with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Permanent Working Group on Legal Aid to support the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Deputy Ministers responsible for Justice and Public Safety on matters relating to legal aid, such as policy development and funding.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 120,327,507 120,327,507 119,827,507 135,627,508 135,627,507 15,800,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 120,327,507 120,327,507 119,827,507 135,627,508 135,627,507 15,800,000

Youth Justice Services Funding Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Youth Justice Services Funding Program (Voted)
Start date
April 2, 1984
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-2013
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.3 Youth Justice

Description
The overall objective of this Program is to support the policy directions of the Youth Criminal Justice Act by financially assisting the provinces and territories in their provision of a range of youth justice services and programs that are consistent with federal policy objectives. The specific objectives of the individual agreements with provinces and territories are to support and promote an appropriate range of programs and services that encourage accountability measures for unlawful behavior that are proportionate and timely; encourage the effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into their communities; target the formal court process to the most serious offences; and target detention and custody to the most serious offences.
Results achieved

Through the Youth Justice Services Funding Program (YJSFP), the Department supported provinces and territories in providing a range of youth justice programs and services offered to young persons in conflict with the law. Specifically, the YJSFP provided federal funding for programs and services that:

  • Encourage timely and proportionate accountability measures for unlawful behavior;
  • Provide for effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons; and,
  • Target the formal court process, detention and custody to the most serious offenders.

YJSFP funding agreements with all provinces and territories are in effect for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Comments on variances
N/A
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of the Youth Justice Initiative was recently completed in 2016-2017. The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2020-2021.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces and territories.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Youth Justice Cost Sharing and Programs, which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussions of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning youth justice.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415 0

Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative (Supporting Families Fund)

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Supporting Families Fund (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2009
End date
March 31, 2017
Type of transfer payment
Grants and Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2013-2014
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.4 Family Justice

Description

The Supporting Families Fund is a key component of the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative (Supporting Families Initiative), which was announced by the Minister of Justice in September 2008 and launched on April 1, 2009. The Fund, renewed on April 1, 2014, for three years ending on March 31, 2017, is aimed at facilitating access to the family justice system for families experiencing separation and divorce through various services, programs, and information resources, particularly those that promote compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. The Fund provides support to provincial and territorial governments for the development and delivery of family justice programs and services. The Fund also supports non-governmental organizations for developing information and training resources that promote public awareness about parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system.

As the Fund sunsets on March 31, 2017, resources to continue to support provincial and territorial activities related to family law in the future will be sought through established Estimates processes to ensure that federal responsibilities continue to be met.

Results achieved

In 2016-2017, the Department allocated $16M to provinces, territories and non-governmental organizations, institutions and associations to provide a range of services, programs and information resources to make it easier for divorcing or separating parents to gain access to the family justice system and to help parents comply with obligations for financial support and custody and access.

All 13 provinces and territories collaborated with the Department to support access to the family justice system through contribution agreements. This collaboration lead to numerous initiatives such as Alberta’s Parenting After Separation for Families in High Conflict online course and the expansion of Ontario’s client online tool to resolve their disputes through mediation services that allows for virtual communications.

In addition, over the course of the fiscal year, the Supporting Families Fund’s provided additional contributions agreements under the pilot projects component to seven provinces and territories and eleven non-government organizations to enhance their engagement to address family justice. This included British Columbia’s testing of innovative ways to deliver family justice services and Nova Scotia’s efforts to assist professionals working with children by providing guidelines and practices standards that facilitate a child-focus approach. Furthermore, funding was provided to address issues related to family justice for families going through separation or divorce, by providing public legal education resources and professional training. Efforts were also made to reach new immigrants. For example, in Alberta, the Chinese Community Service Association translated and culturally adapted information resources for parents after separation and divorces. Similarly, the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick, offered information workshops and produced a Spanish translation of the handbook Family Law Matters for Immigrants in addition to the Korean, Arabic and Mandarin translations produced the year before.

Comments on variances
The Department continued to work diligently with funding applicants, ensuring that funding proposals met the objectives and priorities of the Support Fund. The overall lapse was minimal and demonstrates the success of the Department’s approach.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
The last evaluation of the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative was completed in 2014-2015. An evaluation of the Canadian Family Justice Fund (formerly the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative) is planned for completion in 2018-2019.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces, territories, non-governmental organizations, associations, academics and individuals.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
Provinces and territories are consulted on an ongoing basis through the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO) Family Justice Committee meetings and working groups. NGOs and others provide comments through an annual reporting mechanism.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 50,000 2,344 0 0
Total contributions 15,827,448 16,000,000 15,950,000 15,997,656 15,997,656 47,656
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 15,827,448 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000 15,997,656 47,656

Victims Fund

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Victims Fund (Voted)
Start date
Victims of Crime Initiative (VCI) April 1, 2000, and Federal Victims Strategy (FVS) April 1, 2007
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2016-2017
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.2 Victims of Crime

Description
The Victims Fund is a grants and contributions fund designed to support the objectives of the Federal Victims Strategy to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice system. The Victims Fund provides funding to governmental and non-governmental organizations to implement a wide range of victim-focused projects and activities that are responsive to a diversity of survivors and victims of crime communities. The Fund also provides financial assistance to eligible Canadians victimized abroad as well as to registered victims of crime to attend Parole Board of Canada hearings.
Results achieved

The Victims Fund supported a variety of projects and activities that developed new approaches, promoted access to justice, improved the capacity of service providers, increased awareness of services available to victims of crime and their families, and reduced financial hardship of victims. Through the Victims Fund, in 2016-2017 the Department:

  • Made available $16.17M to provincial and territorial governments to establish Family Information Liaison Units (FILUs) within their existing victims services departments. Nine provinces and two territories were approved for funding to begin the implementation. FILUs work collaboratively with the Policy Centre for Victims Issues and the provinces and territories to ensure that each jurisdiction is providing support that is culturally-responsive, trauma-informed and community-based for families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.
  • Launched a Call for Proposals for training to Criminal Justice Professionals on the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights (CVBR) to promote knowledge and support the implementation of the rights set out in the CVBR. The funding was intended to promote a consistent understanding and application of the legislation across the country. Funding was approved for one national non-governmental organization and seven provinces and territories to support the implementation of the CVBR. In addition, the Department produced a public legal education pamphlet on the CVBR and provided training to criminal justice system professionals in different parts of the country.
  • Provided funding to support 244 Canadians victimized abroad and 439 victims to attend Parole Board of Canada hearings (including support persons).
  • Provided more than $1.2M for 182 events and projects across Canada to mark the Victims and Survivors of Crime Week.
Comments on variances
The process leading to the approval of the amendments to the Terms and Conditions took longer than anticipated. To mitigate the lapse, the Department considered new projects, including Child Advocacy Centers, and launched a call for proposals on a government priority related to sexual violence. Although the call for proposals yielded a high number of applications, the Department saw a higher than forecasted lapse as most of the funding requests received were for projects beginning in 2017-2018.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of the Justice Federal Victims Strategy was recently completed in 2015-2016. The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2020-2021.
General targeted recipient groups
Provincial, territorial, municipal governments, international governmental and non-governmental organizations, associations, bands and tribal councils and self-governing First Nations, Inuit, Métis, educational institutions and individuals.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
Provinces and territories are consulted on an ongoing basis through the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO) meetings and working groups on Victims of Crime. NGOs and others provide comments through an annual reporting mechanism.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 1,870,918 1,432,852 3,250,000 3,250,000 2,284,080 (965,920)
Total contributions 9,274,761 12,434,287 18,255,723 21,338,223 16,463,951 (1,791,772)
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 11,145,679 13,867,139 21,505,723 24,588,223 18,748,031 (2,757,692)

Youth Justice Services–Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Youth Justice Services—Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (voted)
Start date
April 1, 2002
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-2013
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.3 Youth Justice

Description
The Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) Program provides federal funding to all provinces and territories to ensure that they have the capacity required to carry out assessments and provide therapeutic programs and services to youth convicted of serious violent offences and who are suffering from mental health issues. The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist the provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the IRCS sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other sentencing options applicable under the Act to serious violent youth offenders with mental health issues. It is expected that these services might reduce the likelihood of further violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences.
Results achieved

Through the IRCS Funding Program, provinces and territories were supported in providing a range of youth justice programs and services that target young persons in conflict with the law. Specifically for the IRCS Program, federal funding was provided towards specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) and other sentencing options applicable under the Act for serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems (exceptional cases).

During 2016-2017, a total of 19 IRCS orders were issued by the courts and became eligible for federal funding, bringing the total number of active IRCS cases to 51. In addition, 22 exceptional cases were approved for funding during 2016-2017, bringing the total number of active exceptional cases to 25. IRCS funding agreements with all provinces and territories are effective for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Comments on variances
N/A
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of the Youth Justice Initiative was completed in 2016-2017. The next evaluation is planned for completion in 2020-2021.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces and territories.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Youth Justice Cost Sharing and Programs which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussions of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning youth justice.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 10,846,381 11,003,383 11,048,000 11,048,000 11,048,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 10,846,381 11,003,383 11,048,000 11,048,000 11,048,000 0

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2002
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-2013
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.6 Justice in Official Languages

Description

The Contraventions Act provides an alternative to the summary conviction procedure of the Criminal Code for the prosecution of certain offences under federal statutes and regulations. It allows certain federal offences to be prosecuted, using provincial court processes, by means of a ticketing scheme. In 2001, the Federal Court concluded that while the federal government is authorized to use the prosecution scheme of a province to prosecute federal contraventions, it must comply with all language rights requirements that would be applicable in the context of a purely federal prosecution scheme. As a result, in 2003, the federal government established the Contraventions Act Fund to support the implementation of the Contraventions Act in a manner consistent with all applicable constitutional and legislative language rights.

The Fund aims to support provinces and territories in respect of judicial activities and extra-judicial services in both official languages to conform to the Federal Court decision in respect of proceedings instituted under the Contraventions Act.

Results achieved
Participating provinces successfully fulfilled official languages duties on behalf of the federal government by sustaining measures meant to ensure that offenders’ language rights are respected in relation to the processing of federal contraventions. As a result, offenders choosing the language of the minority were successful in requiring a court hearing in such language. In 2016-2017, Newfoundland and Labrador’s Francophone community was consulted on the linguistic measures put in place and its feedback was positive towards the implementation of the regime in the province. Discussions will continue with Saskatchewan and Alberta towards implementation of a contraventionsregime in those provinces.
Comments on variances
Funds allocated reflect the need amongst participating provinces.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of the Contraventions Act Program was recently completed in 2016-2017.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces, territories and municipalities.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
The Department actively engages its provincial counterparts to receive feedback on training and delivery of the Contraventions Regime.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 3,810,821 3,363,960 9,094,900 4,013,857 3,882,648 (5,212,252)
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 3,810,821 3,363,960 9,094,900 4,013,857 3,882,648 (5,212,252)

Indigenous Courtwork Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Indigenous Courtwork Program (formerly Aboriginal Courtwork Program)
Start date
April 1, 1978
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2013-2014
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant, and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2 Justice System Support

1.1.2.5 Indigenous and Northern Justice

Description
The objective of the Indigenous Courtwork Program (ICW) (formerly the Aboriginal Courtwork Program) is to facilitate and enhance access to justice by assisting Indigenous people involved in the criminal justice system (whether as accused persons, victims, witnesses or family members) in obtaining fair, just, equitable and culturally competent treatment.
Results achieved

The implementation of Budget 2016 required close collaboration and engagement between federal, provincial, territorial partners and Indigenous service delivery agencies. This was done primarily through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial and Tripartite Working Group on the Indigenous Courtwork Program.

A National Strategic and Implementation Plan was developed by ICW service delivery agencies that will be used to guide the future development and objectives of the Program.

The results of national engagement sessions attended by applicants, recipients and partners were shared and discussed with stakeholders. The focus of the sessions was to co-develop solutions to overrepresentation and gaps in services. A call for proposals was launched to prototype and test approaches that could impact on overrepresentation and gaps in services.

Indigenous courtworkers continued to provide high quality, timely services to Indigenous people in contact with the criminal justice system (including accused persons, victims, witnesses and family members). The services provided have been found to decrease the number of cases coming before the courts, speed up the processing of cases, and reduce the number of Administration of Justice Offences (i.e., failure to appear in court, breach of a probation order, being unlawfully at large, and failure to comply with an order).

Comments on variances
Budget 2016 announced a $4 million per year increase to the ICW Program on an ongoing basis to assists Indigenous peoples moving through the criminal justice system to better understand their rights and the nature of the charges against them. From that amount, the ICW received $3.05 million in 2016-2017 for the provinces.
Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
An evaluation of the Indigenous Courtwork Program is currently underway and is planned for completion in 2017-2018.
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces, territories and Indigenous Courtwork delivery agencies that provide services to Indigenous Persons (adult and youth) in contact with the criminal justice system.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
The Department undertook a number of engagement activities through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial and Tripartite Working Group on the Indigenous Courtwork Program that built bridges, trust and partnerships to address priorities related to addressing the overrepresentation and gaps in services for Indigenous Persons in the criminal justice system.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,568,507 5,259,779 4,911,363 7,946,639 7,918,177 3,006,814
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,568,507 5,259,779 4,911,363 7,946,639 7,918,177 3,006,814

Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories (in the areas of Legal Aid, Indigenous Courtwork and Public Legal Education and Information Services)

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories (in the areas of Legal Aid, Indigenous Courtwork and Public Legal Education and Information Services) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 1997
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Voted through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2016-2017
Strategic Outcome
A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

1.1 Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

1.1.2; Justice System Support

1.1.2.5 Aboriginal and Northern Justice

Description
The goal of the Access to Justice Services Agreements is to provide consolidated federal government funding support to Canada’s three territories for access to justice services (including criminal and civil legal aid, Indigenous Courtwork, and Public Legal Education and Information) through ongoing contribution agreements that allow the territories the flexibility needed to provide these services in a challenging environment (vast distances, harsh climate, cultural/linguistic differences). The overarching goal of federal support for Indigenous Courtwork (ICW) services is to facilitate and enhance access to justice by assisting Indigenous people involved in the criminal justice system to obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. With regard to legal aid services in the territories, the federal goal is to enable the territories to provide legal aid services to economically disadvantaged and vulnerable persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice and civil matters. And, with respect to public legal education and information, the goal is to assist the territories in providing members of the public with the legal information they need to make informed decisions and participate effectively in the justice system.
Results Achieved

The integrated Access to Justice Services Agreements (AJAs) provided support for the delivery of access to justice services (legal aid, Indigenous courtwork and public legal education and information) in northern communities while recognizing the unique needs and circumstances of northern communities and residents.

Funding under the AJAs provides vulnerable populations with continued access to Canada-wide legal systems that are efficient, fair, relevant and accessible, and promotes public confidence in access to justice.

Increased funding through Budget 2016 for both legal aid and Indigenous Courtwork services supported innovation and enhanced services to address the needs of vulnerable populations, including Indigenous persons and those suffering from mental health issues.

Comments on variances

Budget 2016 provides $88 million over five years, starting in 2016–17, to increase funding in support of the provision of criminal legal aid in Canada. From that amount, the AJAs program received $0.45 million in 2016-2017.

Also, Budget 2016 announced a $4 million per year increase to the ICW Program on an ongoing basis to assists Indigenous peoples moving through the criminal justice system to better understand their rights and the nature of the charges against them. From that amount, the AJAs program received $0.95 million in 2016-2017.

Audits completed or planned
N/A
Evaluations completed or planned
Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories are examined as part of the Legal Aid, Indigenous Courtwork and Justice Partnership and Innovation Program evaluations. The evaluations of the Legal Aid Program and the Justice Partnership and Innovation Program were recently completed in 2016-2017. The evaluation of the Indigenous Courtwork Program is planned for completion in 2017-2018.
General targeted recipient groups
Territorial governments and service delivery agencies that provide services to economically disadvantaged persons including vulnerable populations.
Engagement of applicants and recipients
The Department works through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Permanent Working Group on Legal aid as well as the Federal-Provincial-Territorial and Tripartite Working Group on the Indigenous Courtwork Program to support and promote territorial participation and engagement in access to justice policy and innovation.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15 Actual spending 2015–16 Actual spending 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Total authorities available for use 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 4,856,593 4,856,593 4,856,593 6,256,593 6,256,593 1,400,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 4,856,593 4,856,593 4,856,593 6,256,593 6,256,593 1,400,000
Date modified: