Initiative in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Evaluation

Appendix B: Interview Guides

Interview Guide - Representatives from the Office of Francophonie, Justice in Official Languages and Bijuralism

The Department of Justice hired PRA Inc. to conduct the evaluation of the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Initiative (hereinafter the “Initiative”), which involves two components: the Support Fund and the component for training justice stakeholders. The evaluation will cover the Initiative’s relevance, design and implementation and the associated success factors. We are asking various groups of stakeholders to take part in this study, including representatives from the Department of Justice Canada, members of advisory committees and working groups as well as other justice professionals.

The information gathered will be used solely for this study and will be managed, stored and destroyed in accordance with the Privacy Act. No information gathered during the interviews will be associated with a stakeholder, and each participant enjoys the right of access to information and the right to protection of his/her personal information. Moreover, your involvement in this interview is voluntary, and you can withdraw from the study at any time. Lastly, please note that the information gathered during these interviews will be shared with the Department of Justice Canada’s Evaluation Division.

Introduction

  • 1. In what way are you involved with the Initiative in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages?

Relevance

  • 2. Overall, please describe what you see as being the federal government’s role pertaining to access to justice in both official languages? How does this role differ from the role of the other stakeholders, including the provincial and territorial governments?

The Initiative’s objectives are to strengthen the capacity of the legal system and its stakeholders for providing services in both official languages and to participate in making official language communities aware of their rights in this regard.

  • 3. In your opinion, how are these objectives connected with your Department’s and the federal government’s priorities in the area of access to justice in both official languages?
  • 4. Please describe the changes that you see in the needs of justice stakeholders regarding the issue of access to justice in both official languages.
  • 5. To date, the federal government’s role in access to justice in both official languages has focused heavily in the area of criminal law. What is your view regarding the potential for broadening this role to other areas of law?

Implementation

  • 6. Implementing the commitments described in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality included the new component specifically connected with training. Please describe your experience in connection with implementing this new component? What lessons did you learn from this experience? What were the main challenges that you faced?
  • 7. How do you see this training-related component changing during the post-Roadmap period?
  • 8. Please describe the strategy that you chose for selecting projects funded by the Support Fund? How does this process under the Roadmap compare to the one you had used under the 2003-08 Action Plan for Official Languages? What lessons did you learn from that experience?
  • 9. In your opinion, to what degree do the Support Fund and the training component adequately reach the groups working in these areas?

Your Department set up a number of advisory structures to support it in implementing the Support Fund and the training component. The list of these structures includes, among others, the Advisory Committee – Justice in Official Languages, the Subcommittee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages and the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages.

  • 10. Please describe how these structures helped implement the Support Fund and the training component. What lessons did you learn from that experience? How do you see the role of these structures changing in the future?
  • 11. Regarding accountability, please describe the strategy that you chose for gathering the information you needed for ensuring effective management of the Support Fund and the training component? What lessons did you learn from that experience?

Success

  • 12. The Support Fund has been funding projects for ensuring improved access to justice services in both official languages since 2003. Please describe what you consider to be the Fund’s main accomplishments over the past eight years. What accomplishments can be expected from the Fund in the coming years?
  • 13. The projects funded through the training component are, for the most part, in the implementation phase. In your opinion, what accomplishments can be expected from this component in the coming years?
  • 14. How do you see the link between these two components changing in the coming years?
  • 15. Based on all the answers that you have provided, how do you think the effectiveness of the Support Fund and the training component could be improved in the coming years?

Conclusion

  • 16. Do you have any other comments?

Thank you for your participation.

Interview Guide - Representatives from the Innovations, Analysis and Integration Group

The Department of Justice hired PRA Inc. to conduct the evaluation of the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Initiative (hereinafter the “Initiative”), which involves two components: the Support Fund and the component for training justice stakeholders. The evaluation will cover the Initiative’s relevance, design and implementation and the associated success factors. We are asking various groups of stakeholders to take part in this study, including representatives from the Department of Justice Canada, members of advisory committees and working groups as well as other justice professionals.

The information gathered will be used solely for this study and will be managed, stored and destroyed in accordance with the Privacy Act. No information gathered during the interviews will be associated with a stakeholder, and each participant enjoys the right of access to information and the right to protection of his/her personal information. Moreover, your involvement in this interview is voluntary, and you can withdraw from the study at any time. Lastly, please note that the information gathered during these interviews will be shared with the Department of Justice Canada’s Evaluation Division.

Introduction

  • 1. In what way are you involved with the Initiative in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages?

Relevance

  • 2. A number of justice stakeholders are called upon to play a role in implementing projects funded through the Initiative. Please describe how you see this division of roles, especially pertaining to the role that the Department of Justice Canada is called upon to play.
  • 3. Please describe the changes you see in the needs of justice stakeholders regarding the issue of access to justice in both official languages.

Implementation

  • 4. Implementing the commitments described in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality included the new component specifically connected with training. Please describe your experience in connection with implementing this new component? What lessons did you learn from this experience? What were the main challenges that you faced?
  • 5. How do you see this training-related component changing during the post-Roadmap period?
  • 6. Please describe the strategy that you chose for selecting projects funded by the Support Fund? How does this process under the Roadmap compare to the one you had used under the 2003-08 Action Plan for Official Languages? What lessons did you learn from that experience?
  • 7. In your opinion, to what degree do the Support Fund and the training component adequately reach the groups working in these areas?

Your Department set up a number of advisory structures to support it in implementing the Support Fund and the training component. The list of these structures includes, among others, the Advisory Committee–Justice in Official Languages, the Subcommittee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages and the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages.

  • 8. Please describe how these structures helped implement the Support Fund and the training component. What lessons did you learn from that experience? How do you see the role of these structures changing in the future?
  • 9. Regarding accountability, please describe the strategy that you chose for gathering the information you needed for ensuring effective management of the Support Fund and the training component? What lessons did you learn from that experience?

Success

  • 10. The Support Fund has been funding projects for ensuring improved access to justice services in both official languages since 2003. Please describe what you consider to be the Fund’s main accomplishments over the past eight years. What accomplishments can be expected from the Fund in the coming years?
  • 11. The projects funded through the training component are, for the most part, in the implementation phase. In your opinion, what accomplishments can be expected from this component in the coming years?
  • 12. How do you see the link between these two components changing in the coming years?
  • 13. Based on all the answers that you have provided, how do you think the effectiveness of the Support Fund and the training component could be improved in the coming years?

Conclusion

  • 14. Do you have any other comments?

Thank you for your participation.

Interview Guide - Representatives from the Sub-Committee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages

The Department of Justice hired PRA Inc. to conduct the evaluation of the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Initiative (hereinafter the “Initiative”), which involves two components: the Support Fund and the component for training justice stakeholders. The evaluation will cover the Initiative’s relevance, design and implementation and the associated success factors. We are asking various groups of stakeholders to take part in this study, including representatives from the Department of Justice Canada, members of advisory committees and working groups as well as other justice professionals.

The information gathered will be used solely for this study and will be managed, stored and destroyed in accordance with the Privacy Act. No information gathered during the interviews will be associated with a stakeholder, and each participant enjoys the right of access to information and the right to protection of his/her personal information. Moreover, your involvement in this interview is voluntary, and you can withdraw from the study at any time. Lastly, please note that the information gathered during these interviews will be shared with the Department of Justice Canada’s Evaluation Division.

Introduction

  • 1. Could you tell us when you joined the Sub-Committee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages? What duties do you have outside of the Sub-Committee?

Relevance

  • 2. Overall, please describe what you see as being the federal government’s role pertaining to access to justice in both official languages? How does this role differ from the role of the other stakeholders, including the provincial and territorial governments?

The objectives of the Initiative are to strengthen the capacity of the legal system and its stakeholders for providing services in both official languages and to participate in making official language communities aware of their rights in this regard.

  • 3. Please describe the changes you see in the needs of justice stakeholders regarding the issue of access to justice in both official languages.
  • 4. To date, the federal government’s role in access to justice in both official languages has focused heavily in the area of criminal law. What is your view regarding the potential for broadening this role to other areas of law?

Implementation

  • 5. Implementing the commitments described in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality included the new component specifically connected with training. What lessons have you learned to date from the implementation of this new component?
  • 6. In your opinion, to what degree do the Support Fund and the training component adequately reach the groups working in these areas?

The Department of Justice Canada set up a number of advisory structures to support it in implementing the Support Fund and the training component. The list of these structures includes, among others, the Advisory Committee – Justice in Official Languages, your Subcommittee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages and the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages.

  • 7. Please describe how your Sub-Committee helped implement the Support Fund and the training component. What lessons did you learn from that experience? How do you see the role of your Sub-Committee changing in the future?

Success

  • 8. The Support Fund has been funding projects for ensuring improved access to justice services in both official languages since 2003. Please describe what you consider to be the Fund’s main accomplishments over the past eight years. What accomplishments can be expected from the Fund in the coming years?
  • 9. The projects funded through the training component are, for the most part, in the implementation phase. In your opinion, what accomplishments can be expected from this component in the coming years?
  • 10. How do you see the link between these two components changing in the coming years?
  • 11. Based on all the answers that you have provided, how do you think the effectiveness of the Support Fund and the training component could be improved in the coming years?

Conclusion

  • 12. Do you have any other comments?

Thank you for your participation.

Interview Guide - Representatives from the F-P-T Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages

The Department of Justice hired PRA Inc. to conduct the evaluation of the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Initiative (hereinafter the “Initiative”), which involves two components: the Support Fund and the component for training justice stakeholders. The evaluation will cover the Initiative’s relevance, design and implementation and the associated success factors. We are asking various groups of stakeholders to take part in this study, including representatives from the Department of Justice Canada, members of advisory committees and working groups as well as other justice professionals.

The information gathered will be used solely for this study and will be managed, stored and destroyed in accordance with the Privacy Act. No information gathered during the interviews will be associated with a stakeholder, and each participant enjoys the right of access to information and the right to protection of his/her personal information. Moreover, your involvement in this interview is voluntary, and you can withdraw from the study at any time. Lastly, please note that the information gathered during these interviews will be shared with the Department of Justice Canada’s Evaluation Division.

Introduction

  • 1. Could you tell us when you joined the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in both Official Languages? What duties do you have outside of the Working Group?

Relevance

  • 2. Overall, please describe what you see as being the federal government’s role pertaining to access to justice in both official languages? How does this role differ from the role of the other stakeholders, including the provincial and territorial governments?

The objectives of the Initiative are to strengthen the capacity of the legal system and its stakeholders for providing services in both official languages and to participate in making official language communities aware of their rights in this regard.

  • 3. Please describe the changes you see in the needs of justice stakeholders regarding the issue of access to justice in both official languages.
  • 4. To date, the federal government’s role in access to justice in both official languages has focused heavily in the area of criminal law. What is your view regarding the potential for broadening this role to other areas of law?

Implementation

  • 5. Implementing the commitments described in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality included the new component specifically connected with training. What lessons have you learned to date from the implementation of this new component?
  • 6. In your opinion, to what degree do the Support Fund and the training component adequately reach the groups working in these areas?

The Department of Justice Canada set up a number of advisory structures to support it in implementing the Support Fund and the training component. The list of these structures includes, among others, the Advisory Committee – Justice in Official Languages, the Subcommittee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages and your Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages.

  • 7. Please describe how your Working Group helped implement the Support Fund and the training component. What lessons did you learn from that experience? How do you see your Working Group’s role changing in the future?

Success

  • 8. The Support Fund has been funding projects for ensuring improved access to justice services in both official languages since 2003. Please describe what you consider to be the Fund’s main accomplishments over the past eight years. What accomplishments can be expected from the Fund in the coming years?
  • 9. Based on all the answers that you have provided, how do you think the effectiveness of the Support Fund and the training component could be improved in the coming years?

Conclusion

  • 10. Do you have any other comments?

Thank you for your participation.

Interview Guide - Stakeholders Working in the Area of Justice

The Department of Justice hired PRA Inc. to conduct the evaluation of the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Initiative (hereinafter the “Initiative”), which involves two components: the Support Fund and the component for training justice stakeholders. The evaluation will cover the Initiative’s relevance, design and implementation and the associated success factors. We are asking various groups of stakeholders to take part in this study, including representatives from the Department of Justice Canada, members of advisory committees and working groups as well as other justice professionals.

The information gathered will be used solely for this study and will be managed, stored and destroyed in accordance with the Privacy Act. No information gathered during the interviews will be associated with a stakeholder, and each participant enjoys the right of access to information and the right to protection of his/her personal information. Moreover, your involvement in this interview is voluntary, and you can withdraw from the study at any time. Lastly, please note that the information gathered during these interviews will be shared with the Department of Justice Canada’s Evaluation Division.

Introduction

  • 1. Please describe your duties at the present time. In what way are they connected with the issue of access to justice in both official languages?

Relevance

  • 2. Overall, please describe what you see as being the federal government’s role pertaining to access to justice in both official languages? How does this role differ from the role of the other stakeholders, including the provincial and territorial governments?

The objectives of the Initiative that we are evaluating are to strengthen the capacity of the legal system and its stakeholders for providing services in both official languages and to participate in making official language communities aware of their rights in this regard.

  • 3. Please describe the changes you see in the needs of justice stakeholders regarding the issue of access to justice in both official languages.
  • 4. To date, the federal government’s role in access to justice in both official languages has focused heavily in the area of criminal law. What is your view regarding the potential for broadening this role to other areas of law?

Implementation

Implementing the commitments described in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality includes the new component specifically connected with training. Along with this are activities funded by the Support Fund.

  • 5. In your opinion, to what degree do the Support Fund and the training component adequately reach the groups working in these areas?
  • 6. Please describe, if applicable, the needs in the area of access to justice in both official languages that are not currently covered by the Initiative as implemented.

Success

  • 7. The Support Fund has been funding projects for ensuring improved access to justice services in both official languages since 2003. Please describe what you consider to be the Fund’s main accomplishments over the past eight years.
  • 8. The projects funded through the training component are, for the most part, in the implementation phase. In your opinion, what accomplishments can be expected from this component in the coming years?
  • 9. How do you see the link between these two components changing in the coming years?
  • 10. Based on all the answers that you have provided, how do you think the effectiveness of the Support Fund and the training component could be improved in the coming years?

Conclusion

  • 11. Do you have any other comments?

Thank you for your participation.

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