Drug and Driving: A Compendium of Research Studies

Annotated Sources (cont'd)

Scotland

52. Ingram, D., Lancaster, B. and Hope, S. (2000)

Recreational Drugs and Driving: Prevalence Survey. Edinburgh: The Scottish Executive Central Research Unit.

Overview

Survey of drugs and driving among Scottish young adults

Type of study, population(s) and proportion tested

Telephone survey

N=1,008 Scottish drivers aged 17-39

Drugs examined (threshold values for detection)
  • Cannabis
  • Alcohol
  • Others
Method of testing and medium used
Other dependent variables

High-risk behaviours -- e.g., speeding, drug use

Findings (including statistical methods)

20% reported driving over legal alcohol limit lifetime -- 5% past 12 months

33% reported drug use lifetime -- 14% past 12 months

  • Most common among young males
  • Cannabis most common drug reported, amphetamines second

9% driven under influence of drugs lifetime -- 5% past 12 months

  • Males, 20-24 years most common

Most felt drugs did not affect driving ability

Most drug driving occurred on the weekend

Most engaged in other risk-taking behaviours

53. Neale, J., McKeganey, N., Hay, G. and Oliver, J. (2000)

Recreational Drug Use and Driving: A Qualitative Study. Edinburgh: the Scottish Executive Central Research Unit.

Overview

Qualitative study of drugs and driving in Scotland

Type of study, population(s) and proportion tested

Examined groups at varying risk for drug driving

  1. n=61 semi-structured interviews at nightclubs with drug users who reported having a driver’s licence
  2. n=88 nightclub attendees who returned a self-completion questionnaire on drugs and driving behaviour
  3. n=536 at bridge toll booths (536 questionnaires returned out of 1850 distributed)
  4. 10 focus groups
Drugs examined (threshold values for detection)

Cannabis, alcohol, others

Method of testing and medium used

Self-reported

Other dependent variables

Attitudes, opinions, circumstances of drug use, driving

Findings (including statistical methods)

13% of toll bridge respondents (age 17-39) used drugs in past 12 months

76% of nightclub attendees used drugs in past 12 months

Drug use more common among young, males -- cannabis most common

Drug driving common among nightclub attendees, not among the general population -- young, males

Drug driving associated with particular lifestyle

Frequency decreased with age

Cannabis considered by users to be less dangerous than other drugs when driving

Users commonly reported they were aware of how their driving was affected but felt capable of taking compensatory action

Alcohol-impaired driving was considered dangerous

Riding as a passenger in a car with a drug driver was common

Poor overall knowledge of the law on drug driving

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