Moving On: The Expansion of the Family Network After Parents Separate

2004-FCY-9E

Phase 3 of a three-part project commissioned by the Department of Justice Canada

The Impact of Parents' Family Transitions on Children's Family Environment and Economic Well-Being: A Longitudinal Assessment

Prepared by:
Heather Juby, Céline Le Bourdais and Nicole Marcil-Gratton
Centre interuniversitaire d'études démographiques
Institut national de la recherche scientifique / Université de Montréal

Presented to:
Family, Children and Youth Section
Department of Justice Canada

The research and analysis are based on data from Statistics Canada. The opinions expressed do not necessarily represent the views of Statistics Canada or of the Department of Justice Canada.

This report may be reproduced, in part or in whole, and by any means, without charge or further permission from the Department of Justice Canada, provided that due diligence is exercised in ensuring the accuracy of the materials reproduced; that the Department of Justice Canada is identified as the source department; and that the reproduction is not represented as an official version of the original report.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada,
 represented by the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada,
 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1.1
Impact of different variables on the likelihood that separated mothers and fathers will enter a new union, Canada, NLSCY, Cycles 1 to 3
Table 1.2
Distribution of children aged 6–13 years in 1996–97, according to family transitions experienced since birth and their parents' conjugal status, NLSCY
Table 1.3a
Percentage of children (aged 6–13 years in 1996–97) who have experienced different types of family transition, according to the type of union at birth, NLSCY
Table 1.3b
Percentage of children aged 6–13 years in 1996–97, born to a single mother, who had experienced different types of family transition by 1996–97, NLSCY
Table 2.1
Impact of different variables on the likelihood that children aged 10–15 years will feel able to confide in their father, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.2
Impact of different variables on the likelihood that children aged 10–15 years will feel able to confide in their father or their mother, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.3
Impact of different variables on the likelihood that children aged 10–15 years whose parents have separated feel able to confide in their father, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.4
Distribution of children aged 10–15 years, according to the mother and father figures identified as those with whom they spend the most time, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.5
Distribution of children aged 10–15 years, according to their family environment and the father figure they have identified, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.6
Indicators of the perception children aged 10–15 years have of their relationship with the father figure, according to the family environment, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.7
Children's perception of the closeness of the relationship with their father and mother figures, by sex and age group, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Table 2.8
Impact of different factors on the likelihood that children will not feel very close to their father figure, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1.1
Distribution of children aged 0–13 years in 1996–97, whose parents were living apart, according to whether new parental unions introduced extra parent figures into their family environment, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.2a
Cumulated probability that children's separated mothers and fathers will enter a new conjugal union, according to the time elapsed since separation, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.2b
Cumulated probability that one or both separated parents will enter a new conjugal union, according to the time elapsed since separation, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.3a
Cumulated probability that children's separated fathers will enter a new conjugal union, by time since separation and region of Canada, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.3b
Cumulated probability that at least one of a child's separated parents will enter a new conjugal union, by time since separation and region of Canada, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.4
Cumulated probability that at least one of a child's separated parents will enter a new conjugal union, by time since separation and region of Canada, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.5
Family pathways from birth for children whose parents were together (married or cohabiting) at their birth, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.6
Family pathways followed since birth and family environment in 1996–97, for 1000 children aged 6–13 years, whose parents were together (married or cohabiting) at their birth, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.7
Family pathways followed since birth and family environment in 1996–97, for 1000 children aged 6–13 years, whose parents were living apart at their birth, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.8
Distribution of children aged 6–13 years, according to the number of family transitions experienced between birth and 1996–97, by context at birth, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.9
Proportion of children aged 0–13 years in 1996–97 whose mother or father formed a new union, according to the existence of stepsiblings, and whether they share a residence with them on a part- or full-time basis, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.10
Among children whose separated mother or father formed a new union, the proportion whose parent had a child with a new partner, according to the time elapsed since separation, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.11
Proportion of children aged 0–13 years in 1996–97 whose mother or father created a new union, according to the presence of stepsiblings or half-siblings in their family network, NLSCY, Cycles 1 and 2
Figure 1.12
Distribution of children aged 0–13 years in 1996–97, according to whether stepsiblings or half-siblings have been part of their family network, NLSCY
Figure 2.1
Proportion of children aged 10–15 years, according to various relatives or other individuals with whom they are able to talk about themselves and their problems, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.2
Proportion of girls and boys aged 10–15 years who are able to confide in their mother or father, by age group, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.3
Distribution of girls and boys aged 10–15 years, according to whether they are able to confide in their mother or father, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.4
Distribution of girls and boys aged 10–15 years, according to whether they are able to confide in their mother or father, by age group, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.5
Distribution of children aged 10–15 years, according to whether they are able to confide in their mother or father, and according to their family environment, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.6
Among children aged 10–15 years who are able to confide in one of their parents, proportion who are not able to confide in the other, according to the family environment, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.7a
Perception of the relationship with the most common mother and father figures identified by children aged 10‑15 years, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.7b
Perception of the relationship with the most common mother and father figures identified by children aged 10‑15 years, Canada, NLSY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.7c
Perception of the relationship with the most common mother and father figures identified by children aged 10‑15 years, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.7d
Perception of the relationship with the most common mother and father figures identified by children aged 10‑15 years, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Figure 2.8
Distribution of children aged 10–15 years, according to the closeness of their relationship with their father, by household income, Canada, NLSCY, Cycle 3, 1998–99
Date modified: